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If a bowler takes wicket in the last ball of an over and takes other two wickets in the first two balls of the next over then it is considered as Hat-trick.

But what if a bowler takes last two wickets in one match and in the next match he takes a wicket in the first ball of his very first over. Will it considered as a Hat-trick?

Similar (and related) question: What if a bowler takes last two wickets in first innings of a test match and in the second innings (of the same test match) he takes a wicket in the first ball of his very first over. Will it considered as a Hat-trick?

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@Sancho - Why are you asking this question to all? Why don't you ask it separately? Look at here –  hims056 Feb 27 '13 at 11:09
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+1, I tried to add this in my qn, but it may lead to multiple qns in a songle post, about which u are discussing in meta –  Sports Fan Feb 28 '13 at 13:43
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@SportsFan - Actually there was a confusion in Wikipedia's definition. But in it's other definition it is clearly stated that it should be done within a match. :) –  hims056 Feb 28 '13 at 13:46
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the pitch, weather conditions, player's mood, scores,pressure and much more will be different in the next match, so, hat-trick can't be extended to another match –  Sports Fan Feb 28 '13 at 13:49
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Serial editing @edmastermind29 :) –  hims056 Apr 26 '13 at 12:14

3 Answers 3

From Wikipedia

A hat-trick occurs in cricket when a bowler dismisses three batsmen with consecutive deliveries. The deliveries may be interrupted by an over bowled by another bowler from the other end of the pitch or the other team's innings, but must be three consecutive deliveries by the individual bowler. Only wickets attributed to the bowler count towards a hat-trick; run outs do not count.

Here one thing we have to remind is that, there is no official definition or law for Hat-Tricks. There are no official wordings or like that as how a Hat-Trick is achieved. It is more commonly a term used by media and others who see this an individual achievement by a player. So basically it is to be left with each person's perspective as to which one is a Hat-Trick or which one is not.

Like asked in this question one can argue over a Hat-Trick with a wide ball(or no-ball) in between.

Anyway in the same link I provided, there are some peculiar Hat-Tricks explained, like the one you asked.

Some hat-tricks are particularly extraordinary. On 2 December 1988, Merv Hughes, playing for Australia, dismissing Curtly Ambrose with the last ball of his penultimate over and Patrick Patterson with the first ball of his next over, wrapping up the West Indies first innings. When Hughes returned to bowl in the West Indies second innings, he trapped Gordon Greenidge lbw with his first ball, completing a hat-trick over two different innings and becoming the only player in Test cricket history to achieve the three wickets of a hat-trick in three different overs.

So you can say it is a Hat-Trick spread over two innings/match or you dont agree at all. As I said above it is each person's perspective.

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We can say Hat-trick can be spread over two innings but what about two matches? the given example is for innings only. I have doubt about two matches. –  hims056 Feb 27 '13 at 11:21
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The given example is not based on any official rule or record. It is simply put in a general perspective. You can argue that it is not a Hat-Trick. –  RKN Feb 27 '13 at 11:27
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IMO it doesn't matter if it is in the same over, innings, match or series. As long as 3 wickets come off 3 balls, it is a hat-trick. But like @RKN mentioned, there is no official rule and it is one's prerogative to interpret the rule as one deems fit. –  Orangecrush Feb 27 '13 at 11:34
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@Orangecrush - As per this answer Hat-trick must be completed within a given match. –  hims056 Feb 28 '13 at 6:42
    
@Sancho - I already told that the given definition is unclear not wrong. See my answer. –  hims056 Feb 28 '13 at 9:04
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As per Wikipedia's definition of Hat-Trick

a bowler taking a wicket off each of three consecutive deliveries that he bowls in a single match (whether in the same over or split up in two consecutive overs, or two overs in two different spells, or even spread across two innings of a test match or first-class cricket game).

So from the definition we can say that a Hat-Trick must be occur within a single match. It can not be spread across two matches. But it can, of course, be spread across the two innings of a double-innings match, such as a Test match.

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+1. I guess my definition was wrong. Read a couple more sources where it says the hat-trick cannot be spread over matches. –  Orangecrush Mar 1 '13 at 2:37

Its a hat trick for the match not matches. What next someone on 99 not out will get a single next game and claim a 100? Similarly, a hat trick doesn't count for multiple matches.

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