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I don't know if this is actually possible based on 3 outs in an inning, but is it possible to be on base when it is your turn to bat? If so what happens to your at-bat.

Scenario would be lead-off batter gets on can the order return to his turn at bat before he scores?

Single, then on 3rd base when he is up to bat?

Does this make sense?

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

Apart from batting out of order, the answer is no.

The whole purpose of batting is to hit the ball to obtain the right to run the bases. So a batter can't get on base without hitting the ball first (unless he walks).

Counting home plate (where you bat), there are potentially four base runners. Three outs ends the inning, so there can be at most two outs, with the inning continuing. That accounts for six men.

There are nine men on the baseball team, which means that there will be at least three more men ahead of you before you can bat again if you've just scored a run.

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re your edit, or gets hit by the pitch, or reaches on a dropped third strike, or is granted the base due to catcher's interference.... –  wax eagle Sep 20 '13 at 2:07
    
@waxeagle: I consider all of those "walks," with the most usual one being "base on balls." –  Tom Au Apr 21 at 20:34
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Ok did some more googling and came across section 6.07 of the MLB rules (http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/official_info/official_rules/batter_6.jsp). It allows for 1 player to bat out of order as long as no appeal is made.

Example #6 covers this scenario:

"PLAY (6). Daniel walks and Abel comes to bat. Daniel was an improper batter, and if an appeal is made before the first pitch to Abel, Abel is out, Daniel is removed from base, and Baker is the proper batter. There is no appeal, and a pitch is made to Abel. Daniels walk is now legalized, and Edward thereby becomes the proper batter. Edward can replace Abel at any time before Abel is put out or becomes a runner. He does not do so. Abel flies out, and Baker comes to bat. Abel was an improper batter, and if an appeal is made before the first pitch to Baker, Edward is out, and the proper batter is Frank. There is no appeal, and a pitch is made to Baker. Abels out is now legalized, and the proper batter is Baker. Baker walks. Charles is the proper batter. Charles flies out. Now Daniel is the proper batter, but he is on second base. Who is the proper batter? RULING: The proper batter is Edward. When the proper batter is on base, he is passed over, and the following batter becomes the proper batter."

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has there been a case in the major leagues where someone batted out of order and the opposition did not notice it? –  Bob Aug 27 '13 at 14:28
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