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Most of the current T20 leagues around the world are very new and the playing rosters are typically not settled; players change teams a lot between seasons. In addition, many players play in a lot of these leagues, often for only brief periods such as a few games at the start and end of the season only due to international commitments.

In these cases, what determines the eligibility to play for a team in the CLT20? Is there a minimum number of games or is playing just 1 game enough? What if a player was contracted to a team, but didn't actually play any games due to injury or form? Maybe there are no rules at all, and the franchise can bring any players they can managed to hire along to play the CLT20, even if they have never played for that team before? If a player played for a team in a previous season, but not the one in which the team qualified for the CLT20, can they play?

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related sports.stackexchange.com/questions/3236/… –  Bogdanovist Sep 20 '13 at 5:51
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I'm thinking a T20 tag may be useful since we have 10 or so questions on the subject, but I don't know enough about cricket to be sure. –  Michael Myers Sep 20 '13 at 19:59
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For new users, if they saw a tag for T20 cricket they would assume there would be tags for one day cricket and test match cricket as well. With higher traffic such tags would be warranted, but it's probably not for the best at this stage. That's my best guess anyway. –  Bogdanovist Sep 22 '13 at 23:59

3 Answers 3

There is no eligibility to play for a team. Any player can play in CLT20 if he is contracted by owner of the team. And playing XI is decided by captain and coach. At start of any league every team has to submit their final list of players. And only these player can play through out league. In between league, team can not change or swap player without any special reason. So yes there is no eligibility to play.

Example: If you have seen last season of IPL(Indian premier League) there was a player from Rajasthan Royals named PRAVIN TAMBE. When he debuted for Rajasthan Royals, He was not having any experience or he never even played any first class / International Matches. At the end of league Rajasthan Royals was qualified for CLT20 and PRAVIN TAMBE played there also.

So there is no such kind of eligibility needed to play for team. You and me also can play if any team hire us.

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The player eligibility rules, while not set in stone, are based on avoiding any contractual conflicts between various parties connected to the CLT20.

All participating players, nearly irrespective of their club, typically have to submit a NOC(No-Objection Certificate) from their home cricket board. This certificate grants the CLT20 to utilize the services of the players for the specified period. Since many players playing in the CLT20 are centrally contracted players of various countries, this is a necessity.

Next up, in the case of a clash between a player qualifying as a part of two franchises, the conflict is resolved in accordance to the below:

The Champions League rules also state that if a cricketer is a part of two qualifying teams, and does not play for the team from his home country in the tournament, the team he represents must pay his home side $150,000.

I'm sure there is a ruling regarding adding players who haven't played in the IPL to an IPL team for the CLT20, but I can't seem to remember anything regarding that.

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Where as I thought it only depends on your fitness as well as your performance now a days. I think there is no particular parameter such as Have you played any match before or not for your team? Or What's your contract fees etc.

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