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I read a problem in the newspaper around 10 years back. Here is the problem

Team A scored 250 runs for 9 wickets in 50 overs. Team B was 250 for 0 in 49 overs. Eventually Team A won the match by virtue of losing fewer wickets. Hence Team B to lost 10 wickets in 1 over.

The main part of this question was no two players were dismissed in the same way. How is it possible to dismiss 10 players in an over such that all the dismissals are unique.

Partial Solution 9 players dismissed in an over

At the beginning of the over the following sequence of events takes place.

  1. Batsman 1 decides to get dismissed as Retired Out (different from Retired Hurt).
  2. Batsman 2 is Timed Out as he delays coming to the crease.
  3. The runner on the non-strikers end is dismissed via Run Out as he was backing up too much. Also called Mankading.

Effectively at this point we have dismissed three players without a single ball being bowled.

The next six balls allow for the following dismissals.

  1. Bowled
  2. Caught
  3. Leg Before Wicket
  4. Stumped
  5. Hit Wicket
  6. Handled the Ball

I am unable to find a way of dismissing the tenth batsman as we are now out of balls.

The only other option that I believe is Obstructing the field, though I am not sure if it is possible to be given out for obstructing the field before a ball is bowled.

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Has this situation ever happened in real time cricket? :D –  Ganesh Apr 21 at 15:06

3 Answers 3

Some possibilities are there:

  1. If you are looking at not losing a match and making every batsmen out in unique ways without any extras, it is not possible:

  2. If the batting team requires more than 1 run:

    First three batsmen out, as you described, without facing a ball. The next batsman is Stumped out in wide ball so the wicket is fallen and still remain 6 balls to bowl and at least 1 run to win. Then next six batsmen is out as below:

    1. Bowled
    2. Caught
    3. Leg Before Wicket
    4. Hit the ball twice
    5. Hit Wicket
    6. Handled the Ball
  3. If you are looking at not losing a match when only 1 run is required to win and making every batsmen out in unique ways with extras are allowed:

    First three batsmen out, as you described, without facing a ball. While the next ball is going to be faced by the next batsman, the batsman attempting to steal a run during the bowlers run up. The umpire intervene and awards 5 runs penalty to fielding side for this unfair act. (here the ball is considered a dead ball - Law 42.16). Still the first delivery is to be bowled. The next batsman is Stumped out in wide ball so the wicket is fallen and still remain 6 balls to bowl and at least 1 run to win. Then next six batsmen is out as below:

    1. Bowled
    2. Caught
    3. Leg Before Wicket
    4. Hit the ball twice
    5. Hit Wicket
    6. Handled the Ball
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2  
correct answer. –  Sports Fan Dec 10 '13 at 7:04

Based on the links provided on the following websites with regards to Obstructing the field, it is possible to be given out based on words, so technically you can be given out before the ball is bowled for Obstructing the field.

Here are some links

http://www.sportingpulse.com/get_file.cgi?id=955417

http://www.cricketforworld.com/2010/01/ways-of-batsman-dismissal-in-cricket.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obstructing_the_field

If it is possible to given out before the delivery is bowled, based on the words said by the guilty party, then we can indeed have 10 unique dismissals in an over without any extra balls being bowled.

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If I am not wrong the obstruction (either by a word or an action) only apply while the ball is in play. In other words he can not be given out when the ball is dead. –  hims056 Dec 10 '13 at 9:49
    
Assume this scenario, the bowler is coming in to ball and the runner is standing outside the crease. Now the bowler warns the runner. When the bowler runs in again the runner is still outside, so the bowler decides to run him out (Mankading) but as he is in the process of doing it the runner throws his bat at the bowler to prevent him from doing it. Would it then be out as Obstructing the field, even though a ball has not been bowled. –  Rahul Kadukar Dec 10 '13 at 9:52
    
Your scenario may be possible but still I am not sure if it is true as Law 37 says while the ball is in play and after the striker has completed the act of playing the ball. –  hims056 Dec 10 '13 at 10:13
    
But here the runner prevented the baller from dismissing him. –  Rahul Kadukar Dec 10 '13 at 10:16
    
The law applies for either batsman. (both) –  hims056 Dec 10 '13 at 10:18

If the non-striker unsuccessfully attempts to stop the fielder taking the catch then he could be given out for obstructing the field on the same ball that the batsman is caught out.

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