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Is it actually called a goal or do they call it a score and therefore shouting "score!" is like shouting "goal!" in football?

Or do they shout "scores!" as in scores a goal/point?

Is either acceptable?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I believe that when commentators shout "score!" when a player scores, it's more often than not preceded by "he shoots". Therefore, what the commentators really say is: "he shoots, he scores!". But they say it at a very rapid pace that to any regular audience, it might sound like just "score!".

Also, goal and point in ice hockey are two different things. A goal is a point but a point is not neccessairly a goal. A point can mean either an assist or a goal. Therefore, a player's statistics, or his contribution to the team's goal tally, is measured most of the time by his point total. For example, a player can have 10 points in the season, which he scored 7 goals and has 3 assists for example. But in ice hockey, a player can still get an assist if he assists the assister (I hope this is clear). For example, when referring to basketball terms for example, an assist is the player who makes a direct pass to another player who scores a basket. In ice hockey, a player can get an assist if he passes the puck to another player who makes the assist, hence, resulting in a point.

All in all, a goal is still called a goal in ice hockey, but a point can mean either an assist or a goal.

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thanks for the answer. you may be right about them just saying "scores" fast, this is what I thought as well. I do understand how points work, I was just thinking about points on the scoreboard (but you're right, only goals should be used for that) –  cantsay May 9 at 17:31
    
Glad I could help! –  Adam May 9 at 17:36

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