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There is 3 recognized yellow-red card pattern in football (just try check a football report in FIFA.com and there's only 3 pattern)

They're

  • Yellow card

  • 2nd yellow card followed by red card

  • Red card

The questions are:

1] When it is applicable to show a 2nd yellow card and followed by a red card. Can't you just directly give a red card? If a player who gets 2nd yellow card, is going to be followed by a red card, why we hear commentator says like "Oh he got a 2nd yellow card! He will miss the next match", since if we're referring to the second pattern, this is impossible since a second yellow card is automatically followed by a red card.

2]Is this pattern possible? Player A:

30' : 1st Yellow Card
60' : 2nd Yellow Card
90' : Red card

It will be very helpful if you can cite it from the Laws of the Game. Thanks

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2  
The second pattern shouldn't be possible, but it has happened due to a refereeing mistake: news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/world_cup_2006/5108722.stm –  Fillet Jul 14 at 7:55
    
You are confusing some things, I think. A second yellow card in the same match is directly followed by a red card (and immediate removal of the player from the field). A second yellow card across matches (but the only one in this single match) means he'll miss the next match (but won't get a red/send-off in this match yet). –  Christian Rau Jul 14 at 15:34
    
@ Christian : that would depend on the contest. In leagues, it's usually three yellow cards (in different games) that brings a one game suspension. In contests that involves fewer games, it is sometimes the result of two yellows. –  Qvist Jul 14 at 22:08
    
@Fillet - the second pattern isn't what happened. It was yellow, yellow, then yellow/red. In fact, the referee had written down the first yellow against #3 for Australia instead of Croatia, so he believed the third was actually the player's second. It might have had something to do with the fact that #3 for Croatia was speaking English with an Australian accent, and this was what confused the referee. (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josip_Simunic) –  studro Jul 15 at 1:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

1) A direct red card is only shown for hard fouls. For less tough fouls the player will get a yellow card. It's a warning. For the second foul he get's the second yellow card, directly followed by a red card, sent off and misses the next match. But only the next match. If a player is sent off by an direct red card, he misses the next tow or more matches.

2) is not possible

The rule a player misses the next match with his second yellow card (not in one game) takes only place in world cups or similar tournaments. In other competition it differs from this. Champions League it's 3 yellow cards and normals season matches it is 5 yellow cards.

your second pattern is not possible, because a second yellow card in a single game is always followed by a red card directly! Only these patterns are possible:

1)

30': 1st yellow card 
60': 2nd yellow card followed directly by a red card, player is sent off

2)

30': 1st yellow card 
90': a direct red card, player is sent off

EDIT:

...I had to look it up to do it right: In English it is "second yellow card". In German we would say "gelb-rote Karte", which literally would be "yellow-red card". So in German it's clear the second yellow card is followed by a red one.

This "second yellow card" occurs also on normal season. The player will miss the next match. BUT this two yellow cards (the first, and the second, followed by the red) will not count for the players sum of yellow cards in the season. It does not set this sum back to zero, the sum stays the same. With the second yellow card the punishment has "increased" to a direct miss in the next match.

In Addition: If the player get's a yellow card followed by a DIRECT red card, later in the game, the first yellow card will count for his sum of yellow cards in the season.

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Question. Does this second yellow card in the same game followed by a red card also occurs on normal season? If so, when they're able to play again (let's say due to red card miss next match penalty), will they yellow card count resets to 0 or still on the same number? (Let's say it's a professional football league. Take Barclay's League for example) Thanks =) –  Realdeo Jul 14 at 13:42
    
@Realdeo see my edit, hope I could clear it up a bit –  Phab Jul 14 at 14:15
1  
There are some problems with this answer. "A direct red card is only shown for hard fouls" - this is not true. –  studro Jul 14 at 23:45
    
"This "second yellow card" occurs also on normal season. The player will miss the next match. BUT this two yellow cards (the first, and the second, followed by the red) will not count for the players sum of yellow cards in the season. It does not set this sum back to zero, the sum stays the same. With the second yellow card the punishment has "increased" to a direct miss in the next match. In Addition: If the player get's a yellow card followed by a DIRECT red card, later in the game, the first yellow card will count for his sum of yellow cards in the season" –  studro Jul 14 at 23:46
    
^ this depends upon the competition rules. –  studro Jul 14 at 23:51

The Laws of The Game are very strict on what a player, substitute or substituted player can be cautioned (shown the yellow card) and sent-off (shown the red card) for. On pages 38-39 of the 2014/15 FIFA Laws of The Game, we find the seven cautionable offences, and seven sending-off offences:

Cautionable offences

A player is cautioned and shown the yellow card if he commits any of the following seven offences:

  • unsporting behaviour
  • dissent by word or action
  • persistent infringement of the Laws of the Game
  • delaying the restart of play
  • failure to respect the required distance when play is restarted with a corner kick, free kick or throw-in
  • entering or re-entering the fi eld of play without the referee’s permission
  • deliberately leaving the fi eld of play without the referee’s permission

A substitute or substituted player is cautioned if he commits any of the following three offences:

  • unsporting behaviour
  • dissent by word or action
  • delaying the restart of play

Sending-off offences

A player, substitute or substituted player is sent off if he commits any of the following seven offences:

  • serious foul play
  • violent conduct
  • spitting at an opponent or any other person
  • denying the opposing team a goal or an obvious goalscoring opportunity by deliberately handling the ball (this does not apply to a goalkeeper within his own penalty area)
  • denying an obvious goalscoring opportunity to an opponent moving towards the player’s goal by an offence punishable by a free kick or a penalty kick
  • using offensive, insulting or abusive language and/or gestures
  • receiving a second caution in the same match

With this information, it is now possible to consider your questions.

While a referee can directly give a red card, the reason a second yellow is shown before a red, is because the player concerned has not committed a sending-off offence. They have only committed one of the seven cautionable offences.

If the referee was to show a direct red, they would be wrong by the Laws, and the send-off (and hence any suspension) may be overturned, and in cases where the result was affected, the game may be replayed for a serious error in law.

However, the seventh sending-off offence listed above is receiving a second caution in the same match. Therefore, if a player is cautioned and shown the yellow card for the second time in one match, the referee is obliged to then immediately send them off and show them the red card, as that sending-off offence has then been committed.

When commentators remark that a player has received a second caution and will miss the next match (but it is only a player's first caution of the match), they are generally talking about suspensions for accumulated cautions, which is entirely different.

Depending upon the competition rules, a player serves a mandatory suspension for receiving a certain number of cautions throughout the competition. For example, during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Finals, if a player received two cautions throughout the competition (up to and including quarter finals), they were suspended for the next match.

Finally, the situation you describe in which a player receives a first caution, then some time later a second caution, then some time later is sent-off isn't possible under the Laws of the Game, but it doesn't mean it hasn't happened.

In the 1974 FIFA World Cup Finals, in the group stage match between Australia and Chile, Ray Richards, number 6 for Australia received a second caution, but wasn't sent-off until some time later when the referee realised his mistake.

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First of all, I'm writing this on my phone, so I wont bring you any sources at the moment. You'll simply have to take my word for it!

In football, there are basically three ways in which you can be sent off:

(1) Two yellow cards in one game - which results in a sending off (red card) per se, and also a one game suspension. Since yellow cards are more or less "warnings", the suspension is just that one game, and no investigation or jury decision regarding a tougher punishment is deemed necessary.

(2) The "light" sort of red card (in swedish it's called "lindrig utvisning", but I'm not sure of the wording in english), which for example is given to a player that stops a goal by using his hands (and who, of course, isn't the goalie). This sort of red card also come with a one game suspension, but no more - hence the "light" before "red card". No investigation is made in this situation neither.

(3) All other sorts of direct red cards mean a sending off as well as a suspension which in most associations is at least two games. Depending on the nature of the foul, the suspension can - at least in theory - be as much as a life time ban from all football related activities. In fact, there are cases where "real" charges has been pressed, and people have been sent to prison.

Apart from the sending offs, players can be suspended by receiving a certain number of accumulated yellow cards over the course of a season/tournament. This number is often set to two or three yellow cards, and almost always results in a one game suspension. If you receive two yellow cards in one game (and is thus sent off) and already have one from an earlier game, the suspension can be 1 + 1 = 2 games.

I hope the answer is clear enough, otherwise just write a comment and I'll try to improve it.

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