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8

The question is "whose fault is it"? Wides are considered to be the bowler's fault, and are scored as runs conceded by the bowler. On the other hand, byes are considered to be the wicket-keeper's fault and not scored as runs conceded by the bowler. The typical case for 5 wides is a ball either so wide or so high that the keeper doesn't have a reasonable ...


8

Cricket has its origins as a gentleman's summer sport as opposed to football which has traditionally been a working man's sport. Cricket has hence had high clothing and cricketers have been very well-dressed since its nascent beginnings. Moreover, cricket during its early stages was not a very athletic game like what football is. Hence there was no acute ...


6

A stumping generally happens when the bowler has deceived the batsman with some combination of length, speed and/or spin and has enticed him to come out of his ground to play a shot - as such, it involves an amount of skill on the part of the bowler so they are credited with the wicket. A run out means that the batsman has hit the ball and decided to run, ...


5

The trousers on a cricket strip are loose and do not significantly affect running speed. What they do help with is both giving some protection to the knees etc when players slide or dive to field the ball, and also keeping players warm - maybe not an issue if you're playing in India, but come and play a match in Durham in April and you'll want not just ...


5

My reading of the ICC regulations indicates that the above scenario would be a no-result. The regulations are available here. The relevant sections are: Section 12.4.2.B.iii states that a minimum of 20 overs in the second innings is required, subject to a result not being achieved earlier. In the example above, a result isn't achieved, as when the rain ...


4

The general principle is that an umpire's LBW decision is overruled only if there is "conclusive" evidence from the UDRS system that the decision was wrong; if the UDRS system presents only marginal evidence, then the original decision stands. The specifics vary according to the exact type of cricket being played and are amended occasionally - you'd need to ...


4

In test cricket the laws of cricket definition of a wide ball is used. law 25 wide ball. In that a ball is a wide if it is not possible to play a normal cricket shot from his normal stance. In ODI and T20 cricket this is modified by an instruction to be very strict on wides, if the batsment can not play a scoring shot it shall be called wide. They also ...


4

Assuming nobody from the fielding side has touched the ball, nothing happens and nobody is out. If someone from the fielding side touches the ball, and it breaks the stumps with the non-striker (the other batsman) out of his ground (beyond the line on the ground in front of the stumps), then the non-striker is run out. It's an unfortunate and frustrating ...


3

There is an additional reason for the wearing of trousers. The pads warn by batsman when strapped on are quite uncomfortable especially in the past when the straps were simple leather strips, hence the trousers offer protection. In the modern era where they are cloth and padded it is predominantly tradition that dictates the wearing of trousers. Although ...


3

"Umpires Call" is a way of saying the decision made by the on-field should stand. The rules of the referral system say that there needs to be a clear mistake by the on-field umpire to reverse the decision. "Umpires Call" is a way of saying that there isn't a CLEAR mistake, and therefore the decision should stand.


2

The ODI regulations specifically prevent a side from declaring, so the option of just stopping batting is not present (see section 14 of this PDF). In theory, they could simply walk off the pitch and forfeit, but would be subject to sanctions if that happened, making it incredibly unlikely. In short, even if you know you cannot win (barring Philip ...


2

It's by no means definitive, but this link states that it's because, when overarm bowling was introduced, another fielder (to complement slip and point) was needed - this was the third fielder, hence third man. This link, however, gives a subtly different interpretation. The first link also gives these explanations: Gully - Refers to the gap or 'gully' ...


2

Largely, this is historical. In the days before one-day cricket, matches generally were won and lost on the number of wickets taken in the fourth innings - it was a rare match which ended up with more than one team likely to win as the match approached its end, but rather a question of whether the team in the winning position could force a win, or whether it ...


2

The sight screen is placed behind the bowler so that the batsman can pick up the ball as soon as possible. It is black for ODIs as the ball is white, but White for Test Matches as the ball is red. There have been length delays as the sight screen can break and moving spectators can throw a batman off.


2

The condition of the pitch directly effects the ease of playing the game. The condition of the pitch effects how easy it is for the batsmen to play shots with confidence, how much the ball will move either through seam or spin and how quickly the ball will travel off the bat. Generally a good pitch should provide assistance to all, bounce and pace for ...


1

The usual laws of run-outs apply here also If the bowler(or any fielder) touches the ball( or the ball comes in contact with any part of the fielder) and the ball hits the stumps at non-striker end and If the batsman is out of his crease then he is out If the batsman is inside the crease then he is not out. The batsman can attempt to take runs if he ...


1

Imagine a test match where the pitch deteriorates significantly over the course of the match, so that by the 4th or 5th day it has very inconsistent bounce and pace and therefore batting is much harder than it was on the earlier days. At that point, if you've got two reasonably matched teams, the team batting last is almost certainly going to lose. ...


1

Wides are considered in test matches (and all other cricket) - however, the criteria for a wide in first class cricket and much looser than in one-day cricket; principally the ball has to be much wider than it does in one-day cricket. For a famous example, see Steve Harmison's first ball of the 2006/7 Ashes series.


1

To answer the question in its simplest form as asked, a batsman may stand in any position he/she likes and will be treated as right/left handed based on how he was stood at the instant of the delivery. He need not tell anyone and may change as many times as he likes. Bowlers may also change the type of bowling and mode of delivery as often as they like. ...


1

The pitch is defined in Law 7 as being a rectangle of 22 yards/20.12m length and 10 feet / 3.05m in width. Law 9 defines the creases and in the case of the return crease the minimum length of the crease which is 8ft /2.44 m behind the popping crease (the front crease) and therefore it must extend 4ft / 1.22 m behind the stumps. This is to aid with ...


1

Very good question indeed! In the given scenario, if the rain interrupts the game after after 12 overs of the second innings and the play can't resume (i.e. not possible) after that, the game will be declared as "no result" sadly. To get result of the match by D/L method, the target must be set by D/L method. To set the target by D/L method, all the ...


1

Think of it as having "resources". In the first innings, the batting side accumulates resources in the form of runs - 300 for 1 is the same as 300 for 9 in resource terms. The side batting second then has 10 wicket "resources" to accumulate the target score. Hence if the side batting second wins, it's because they marshalled their resources properly, to ...



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