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9

Nobody is out. When the wicket was put down at the non-striker's end, the batsman who owned that ground (whichever reached that ground first) was in their ground so are not out. After that, no wicket is put down so there is no dismissal. The batting team would also score one run as the batsmen exchanged ends. For reference, see Law 29 (Batsman out of his ...


6

The match is over as soon as the batsmen complete their first run, so the last five points (from "Player X turns back for another run") are irrelevant. Quoting specifically Law 21.6 Winning hit or extras: As soon as a result is reached [...] the match is at an end. Nothing that happens thereafter [...] shall be regarded as part of it. The result would ...


5

If a single no ball is bowled in an over, there will be 7 deliveries in the over, not 8. Free hit just means that the batsman cannot be out of that ball (except run out, handling the ball, hitting the ball twice, obstructing the field), it does not mean that delivery is not counted (unless, of course, that delivery too is a no ball or wide ball). For ...


4

I was not able to google even a single instance of out "Hit the ball twice" in cricket. You didn't try very hard! The Wikipedia page for "Hit the ball twice" lists two examples. Can a batsman be out "Hit the ball twice of a no-ball"? Yes. You yourself linked to the offical Laws of cricket which state: When No ball has been called, neither ...


4

At the moment, this isn't standard equipment for umpires; only Bruce Oxenford is using it at the moment as far as I'm aware. As such, I'm guessing this is a personal piece of equipment that Oxenford is using and as such it doesn't have a formal name, but yes, it's obviously for the umpire to use as protection from the ball. For what it's worth, this isn't ...


3

Team A has won by 1 wicket. The reason is that once a team has scored enough runs to constitute a result, nothing that happens afterwards is relevant. This is stated in Law 21, Section 6a. In your scenario, once the batsmen have completed the first run, the game is over and the subsequent run-out is irrelevant. The only exception to this law is stated in ...


1

The match ends as soon as the first run is scored. I remember one incident in this context, it was a match IND vs SL where the score was level while Virender Sehwag was on 99*. He missed a century even though he hit a over-boundary as the bowler bowled a no-ball. http://www.espncricinfo.com/sl-tri2010/content/story/472752.html



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