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5

This is not out. The law is very clear - see https://www.lords.org/mcc/laws-of-cricket/laws/law-35-hit-wicket/ - section 2 has clause 3, which says it is not out when "it occurs when he is trying to avoid being run out or stumped."


3

Hi as an umpire its got to be no 1, deliberately padding the ball. You would allow play to continue and then as soon as the ball becomes dead or the batsmen have completed a single run call and signal dead ball disallowing any runs. If he was doing so to avoid injury he would be allowed the runs. Law 26 covers the situations around leg byes. Law 34 ...


2

It's probably worth starting by noting that your understanding of the regulations is incorrect: bowlers are allowed two fast short-pitched deliveries per over in a One Day International. Quoting from the current regulations, section 42.4.1: Law 42.6 (a) shall be replaced by the following: a) A bowler shall be limited to two fast short-pitched ...


2

The Law on no-ball is available here. Section 14 says "Any runs completed by the batsmen or any boundary allowance shall be credited to the striker if the ball has been struck by the bat; otherwise they shall also be scored as No ball extras." Therefore, they should have been awarded the completed runs. They can be run out, according to the run out law ...


2

The T20 international regulations are quite clear about this: Section 41.2.2.c says that "During the Powerplay overs only two fieldsmen shall be permitted outside this fielding restriction area at the instant of delivery. " Section 41.2.2.d says that "During the non Powerplay overs, no more than 5 fieldsmen shall be permitted outside the fielding ...


1

To compete in the ICC U19 CWC Players from Full Member countries must be under the age of 19 on the 1st of September before the event takes place and Players from Associate or Affiliate Member countries must be under the age of 20 on 1st of September before the event takes place. (For the avoidance of doubt this means that at midnight (in the country of ...


1

It depends on the level of cricket you want to play, and on the regulations of the individual organising committees who administer the level you wish to play at. In general, there's usually no issue in playing at a social level, and as you rise through the ranks more restrictions are in place. To play international cricket for another country in general ...


1

No. See Law 24.16: When No ball has been called, neither batsman shall be out under any of the Laws except 33 (Handled the ball), 34 (Hit the ball twice), 37 (Obstructing the field) or 38 (Run out). At least under the standard Laws of Cricket (specifically, Law 42.6 and 42.7), it's a No ball as soon as it passes the batsmen, so it doesn't matter that ...


1

I've never seen an instance of dropped catches or missed stumpings being recorded in official statistics. They may be written into scorebooks as "incidents" or further annotations, but I don't believe they're recorded specifically. Looking at Cricinfo's Statsguru Test Bowling I don't see an ability to search by those items, which would lead me to believe ...



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