New answers tagged

6

This would be out as explained in law 30 - bowled. Simply put it has to touch something else on the field of play before hitting the stumps again for it to be not out bowled.


5

A Powerplay is a fixed-duration period of play in a limited-overs match, during which period the fielding team are subject to restrictions on the placement of their fielders. This typically alters the chances of boundaries being scored and wickets being taken. Extra fielders close to the batsman increase chances of close catches, but also increase the ...


1

Adding onto @Megan's answer, the rules are slightly different for 50 over games (also called One Day Internationals, or ODIs for short). In ODI's: Mandatory powerplay (1-10 overs):In an uninterrupted match (i.e. 50 overs), the first 10 overs of an innings will be a mandatory powerplay. During the mandatory powerplay only two fielders are allowed outside ...


2

I think I found the answer : When running, if the target score is reached, then the batsmen can not run further. If the ball goes for a boundary, that whole boundary is counted, even in excess of the target, but the "extra" running is not counted in excess of the target. Winning hit or extras (a) As soon as a result is reached as defined in 1, ...


-1

ODI's can never result in a draw, unless weather prevents the minimum overs to be bowled, and therefore the number of wickets in hand at the end is really immaterial. This is because, unlike Test cricket, the match is won, lost or tied on whether the 2nd batting team reaches the target in the number of overs allowed. (i.e. a team can still lose with all 10 ...


-1

If both are out of the crease, the player closest to the opposite crease is considered Not-Out or vice-versa and NOT the player arriving at crease first. Example: Player A,B are out of the crease. Ball hits at A's crease, Player A is closest to the opposite crease; Who is considered out?


3

No, age-group teams up to U19 cannot play first-class cricket. This is clearly stated in the document ICC Classification of Official Cricket, on page 3, in the Notes to the First-class Matches section: Matches involving age-group teams up to and including U19 shall not be classified as First-Class matches Note also that despite bearing the name ...


0

Found an article here regarding salaries of cricket umpires in India. However, this was in 2012, so not sure if salaries have been changed since. The article mentions the following for local(non-international) matches: The umpires who are a part of ICC's International Panel and BCCI's Elite Panel receive ₹20,000 per day of the match. The other umpires ...


1

hims056's answer is completely correct, but just to quote the actual Laws on this one (Law 21.6(c)): If a boundary is scored before the batsmen have completed sufficient runs to win the match, the whole of the boundary allowance shall be credited to the side’s total and, in the case of a hit by the bat, to the striker’s score.


4

There is no special case for being "caught behind" or "caught by the wicket keeper", so the rule is the same as at any other time: if the batsmen had crossed at the moment the catch was taken, then the former non-striker takes strike. If the batsmen had not crossed, then the new batsman takes strike. Specifically, see Law 18.12(a): When a batsman is ...



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