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1

The complexity above in baseball looks amusing.. I dont know much abt Baseball.. it might really be required. But in cricket, I dont think any set of clear guidelines exist. Fielders with specific positions would be positioned accordingly and they expect to catch the ball. But yes, even in cricket there can arise a situation where two fielders are running ...


1

There's no limit - a bowler can stop in his run-up as often as he likes, and a batsman can pull out of a delivery as often as he likes. In practice, the umpire will have a word if he feels the players are messing about, and it doesn't happen too often. Note, though, that if a batsman pulls away, and the bowler actually delivers the ball, if the batsman ...


0

Batting index, at least in the matches telecasted by skysports (the recent t20 between England and India) is a simple addition of a batsman's average and strike rate. So if a batsman has an average of 23 and a strike rate of 120 , his batting index will be 143. ...


4

Yes it does - he has an unusual (to some ears) way of pronouncing the word "two", with a little whistle involved. This has been emphasised by some comedians, particularly Billy Bermingham in his (very funny) 12th Man series.


0

LAW 35 (HIT WICKET) - (a) The striker is out Hit wicket if, after the bowler has entered his delivery stride and while the ball is in play, his wicket is put down either by the striker’s bat or by his person as described in Law 28.1(a)(ii), (iii) and (iv) (Wicket put down). either (i) in the course of any action taken by him in preparing to ...


0

Technically, there is no maximum as the player can run an unlimited number of runs per ball providing that the ball remains within the boundary. This would require a very poor fielding performance but technically possible.


0

The most common way would be for the bowler to bowl a no-ball or wide, and the batsmen cross , leaving the guy on 99* on strike. He then needs to score at least one run on the next ball that resulted from the previous illegal delivery.


2

Assuming that (s)he starts on strike, hits 5 sixes and then runs 3 for the 6th ball, so constantly on strike. (S)He does this every over, (s)he scores 33*50=1650!!! (S)He hits the final ball for 6 instead of 3 as no longer needs to maintain the strike, bringing the total to 1653!


0

The word stumping is only used when the wicket keeper breaks the wicket right after a bowler delivers the ball. When anyone else other than wicket keeper does the same in a similar situation, it is called run out even though the effect for batsman is same



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