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0

It's by no means definitive, but this link states that it's because, when overarm bowling was introduced, another fielder (to complement slip and point) was needed - this was the third fielder, hence third man. This link, however, gives a subtly different interpretation. The first link also gives these explanations: Gully - Refers to the gap or 'gully' ...


0

Snicko A Snickometer, commonly known as Snicko, is used in televising cricket to graphically analyse sound and video, and show whether a fine noise, or snick, occurs as ball passes bat. The Snickometer is often used in a slow motion television replay by the third umpire to determine if the cricket ball touched the cricket bat on the way ...


1

The usual laws of run-outs apply here also If the bowler(or any fielder) touches the ball( or the ball comes in contact with any part of the fielder) and the ball hits the stumps at non-striker end and If the batsman is out of his crease then he is out If the batsman is inside the crease then he is not out. The batsman can attempt to take runs if he ...


4

Assuming nobody from the fielding side has touched the ball, nothing happens and nobody is out. If someone from the fielding side touches the ball, and it breaks the stumps with the non-striker (the other batsman) out of his ground (beyond the line on the ground in front of the stumps), then the non-striker is run out. It's an unfortunate and frustrating ...


-3

The earliest bowler to take all 10 wickets in an ICC international cricket match with limited overs was Mehboob Alam (Nepal) for Nepal against Mozambique in Jersey, UK, on 25 May 2008. The match was contested as part of the 2008 ICC World Cricket League Division V competition. The accomplishment has only happened professionally in two other instances, both ...


-2

I'm sure the batsman is allowed to run as long as he desires if the ball is not over the boundary line. The question is if the batsman run 6 times, will he be entitled as hitting a sixer.


-3

In an ODI match against Pakistan, bowled by M Irfan at 0 runs. This was the series where Afridi made 88 on 48 balls.


4

Do you mean the batsman hits it, it goes over the boundary for 4 runs, and they keep running? In that case, no further runs are counted (bar any penalties awarded) as the ball is dead once it crosses the boundary - see Law 23 - Dead Ball. In the event that the batsmen manage to run more than 4 runs before the ball crosses the boundary, the runs ran will ...


-2

The earliest bowler to take all 10 wickets in an ICC international cricket match with limited overs was Mehboob Alam (Nepal) for Nepal against Mozambique in Jersey, UK, on 25 May 2008.


4

This is covered in Law 26 - Bye and Leg Bye section 2 A(i) - the striker must make a genuine attempt to play the ball with his bat, and the umpire is the sole judge of this. If he or she feels the player has not made a genuine attempt (by hiding the bat behind the leg, for instance), they call "dead ball" (after completion of the first run), and return the ...


4

Section 9 of Law 18 covers this situation - in both cases no runs are scored. Once the batsman is dismissed no runs can be credited to the batting side.


0

Hit wicket is out so no runs will be consider and also bye is also not consider if batsman is out.


3

Test match: lowest score never achieved by batsman in an innings is 229. One Day International: lowest score never achieved is 155. T20 International: lowest score never achieved is 82 A note on the method: I kept scrolling on the links until I got the impression that there was no way a missing lower score could appear. This was at 200 for tests, at ...



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