Tag Info

New answers tagged

-3

I'll try to clear this left handed spin thing up... Best to refer to spin bowlers as finger spinners or wrist spinners (even though it is very difficult to bowl any spin ball without both the wrist and fingers co-operating to spin the ball). A left arm orthodox finger spinner turns the ball, to a right handed batsman, from leg to off, bowling the ball with ...


0

Fairly high risk of being given out obstructing the field, I'd think, since he'd be in the wicket-keeper's way.


4

Law 24 covers no ball - section 16 states that a batsman can only be out in the following ways off a no ball: handled the ball run out obstructing the field hit the ball twice so a stumping doesn't count.


3

Yes. Law 41.3 states: If a protective helmet belonging to the fielding side is on the ground within the field of play, and the ball while in play strikes it, the ball shall become dead and [...] 5 penalty runs shall then be awarded to the batting side There is no mention in the Laws as to where the ball may or may not be travelling at the time the ...


4

Sure, from the list of most consecutive test match appearances (link), filtering out the specialist batsmen and all-rounders, we get: Anil Kumble, who played in India's 60 consecutive tests between 18 Oct 1992 and 2 Mar 2000. He is at 33rd position on the list. If we include all rounders under bowlers, the "winner" is: Sir Gary Sobers, who played in West ...


2

Depends on how you define a bowler - Border has 39 test wickets, so he could qualify! Based on the Cricinfo appearances list, the first player not primarily identified as a batsman (that I can see) is Garfield Sobers, who was an all-rounder. The first primary bowler I can see is Anil Kumble (not Glenn McGrath as previously stated). Note that this is from ...


4

The batsman is not out. The exact situation is explained by law 38 and law 29.1.b. As he has made good his ground and then happens to be in the air after doing so, which by the definition of running he must be he will be not out. This was brought in after the slow motion replays started showing batsmen with both feet in the air despite being in. In ...


4

No. As soon as a batsman is out, the ball is dead so there is no way to get two run outs in one ball. The only exception is to get a "regular" run out on a ball, and then to run out the non-striker backing up ("Mankading") before the next ball is delivered.


6

There are two different scenarios here: The on field umpires refer a decision to the third umpire because they are unsure of the correct decision. In this case, the benefit of the doubt goes to the batsman, which generally means "not out". The third umpire is brought into play after the use of a DRS review by one of the teams. In this case, the third ...


3

Batting Team is not allowed to keep their helmets behind the wicket or any part of the ground. If the don't want the helmet they should send it back to the dressing room


2

The answer from Spinner, noting that "any part of his clothing or equipment" can cause a dismissal by Hit Wicket, is correct. I would just like to add a few examples of things that have actually fallen onto the batsman's wicket, causing the batsman to be out Hit Wicket. A dropped bat. This happened to Kumar Sangakkara in a match against India in 2009. A ...


3

This is covered under Law 42, section 3 - https://www.lords.org/mcc/laws-of-cricket/laws/law-42-fair-and-unfair-play/ It says: (a) Any fielder may (i) polish the ball provided that no artificial substance is used and that such polishing wastes no time. (ii) remove mud from the ball under the supervision of the umpire. (iii) dry a wet ball on a piece of ...


6

Yes, it would be out hit wicket under Law 35.1 (a). Law 28.1 indicates that the wicket can be put down by the ball, the bat, any part of the bat becoming detached, the striker's person, or "any part of his clothing or equipment becoming detached."


-2

Strictly according to the Laws, the bail has to be completely removed from the top of the stumps, but, according to the ICC playing conditions regarding the "Zing Bails" the batsman is out as soon as the light goes on.


6

Not out. Quoting from Law 30.1(a): The striker is out Bowled if his wicket is put down by a ball delivered by the bowler and Law 28.1: (a) The wicket is put down if a bail is completely removed from the top of the stumps [...] (b) The disturbance of a bail, whether temporary or not, shall not constitute its complete removal from the top ...



Top 50 recent answers are included