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0

There are two incidents that almost fit the case you ask , both involving the same batsman, Geoffrey Boycott, who was a great test mach opener, famed for his defensive qualities, but sometimes unwilling or incapable of stepping up the scoring rate when the situation demanded it. During the 1979 World Cup final, Boycott was dropped by the West Indian ...


-2

As per the rules it is fine, no one can force bowling team to take wickets if they no intend to. Sometimes in test matches, bowling team avoid nightwatchman wicket even any player wicket to get some time pass as per the match condition that time. But, if a batsman is bolwed, catch or even LBW, it is umpire responsiblity to decide out even bowling team dont ...


1

I've never heard of such a situation occurring, mostly because I don't think it would be particularly effective. Assuming a batsman is swinging hard, the batsmen are going to get at least a run a ball if the fielders aren't trying to get them out, and probably more than that. That's a recipe for losing a game, even a Twenty20 game. A couple of notes on the ...


4

Based on the arrows supplied, that isn't a line as such - it's the edge of the square. The square is the area of the playing surface that's prepared for batting, and will usually be a different colour, due to increased levels of care, particularly watering.


1

Pitch creation is a long process, those pitch are in the process to be created. Some pitches are created for net session for both team as well.


-1

Under 19 - Player must be aged 17 Under 16 - Player must be aged 15 Under 14 - Player must be aged 12


5

They use it to mark the start of their run up without the need to scuff the grass or use spray paint.


1

There is (quite correctly) nothing in the Laws of Cricket which would mean that the umpires would declare the ball dead. If a team is stupid enough to keep throwing the ball hard at the stumps after they've missed three times already, then they deserve to have the batsmen keep racking up the runs. They can always just walk the ball to the wicket.


5

The only situation in which 2.5 m comes into play is if the Decision Review System is used. At that point, if the point of impact is more than 2.5 m from the stumps, then (hand waving slightly) the on-field umpire's original decision is less likely to be overturned. Specifically, see section 3.3(i)(iii) of the Decision Review System - Playing Conditions ...


2

For one-day internationals, being on the 30 yard markers makes the fielder an infielder. To quote from the 2014-2015 playing conditions, Law 41.2.3(a): During the first block of Powerplay Overs [...], only two fieldsmen shall be permitted outside this fielding restriction area at the instant of delivery During the second block of Powerplay Overs ...


3

All grounds have more than one pitch - this is a requirement as a fresh pitch is required for each match, and pitches take time to recover and prepare. Big grounds will have 20 to 30 pitches across the square, while even very small ones will have 5 or 6.


-2

Specific competition regulations cover this, as it's not covered in the Laws of the game. These regulations usually say that the fielder must be inside the circle at the instant of delivery, so if he's not there he's outside and subject to the relevant penalty.


-1

I think it should be to make 30 yard circle.It is not to make diagram easier. you can see the exteded line above middle stump in the link: s2.hubimg.com/u/6323665_f520.jpg


4

I suspect the incident you're thinking of is one from the Benson & Hedges Cup in 1979, when Brian Rose, the captain of Somerset, declared his side's innings closed with one run on the board and no wickets down after one over in his team's final group match against Worcestershire. The situation was that the only way that Somerset could possibly not ...


4

From Law 6 (The bat): The bat The bat consists of two parts, a handle and a blade. The law considers the entire bat, consisting of the handle and the blade, as one entity, and doesn't treat the front surface any different from the rest of it. You could hit the ball with the back surface or even the handle, it would be treated as a contact ...


3

I'd say this is a refusal to play the match, which would be covered by Law 21(3): Notwithstanding any agreement under Law 12.1(b) (Number of innings), a match shall be lost by a side which [...] in the opinion of the umpires refuses to play and the umpires shall award the match to the other side. Alternatively, if the batsman simply stop running, they ...


0

You can, but if I was 1st slip I'd refuse to stand where you suggested. The ball comes fastest to first slip, and the extra distance is to allow the player to react. To answer your question, there are no restrictions preventing you from doing it, just logical reasons why it doesn't happen.


1

As stated by @TrueDub, the 2 fielders only rule on the leg side behind the popping crease is mandatory for all forms of cricket, ie Test, ODI & T20. However, each format has other different fielding restrictions. Test cricket - Apart from the leg side rule, there are no restrictions what so ever on fielding. You can have all the fielders on the ...


1

Teesra is basically a backspin bowl in which the ball is released in such a way that it spins towards the bowler so due to magnus effect, ball will be in the air flat and after pitching it will either skid or gets slow...hence the batsman will not be able to time the ball correctly.


2

The only restriction in the Laws is that there can only be 2 fielders, other than the wicketkeeper, behind the popping crease on the on side see section 5 here. Specific competitions may have separate regulations governing the number of players on the off or on sides.


0

Another advantage that lies in allowing chasing team to bat first in super over is saving time and efforts because the fielding team is ready to field again soon after innings end as all 11 players are in the ground in fielding and bowling gears while on the other end, chasing team is ready to bat again as their players are already in the stands. 1 over ...


1

Let's analyse two options as to why the chasing team bats first in super over. The team that won the toss chose to bat first, but failed to win the match even with the advantage of toss. So exactly the opposite decision is imposed on the team in super over, as such the team has to chase the target in super over. The team that won the toss chose to field ...



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