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-3

if the batsman had clean bowled on the free hit and he touch the bowl with bat before hitting the stumps no runs will be given to the batting side because bowl hit the stumps and be dead no runs on the dead ball


-1

Just to endorse and agree with all the above, it's weird the way this notion of a gloomy, overcast day is meant to produce incredible swing when science contradicts that. I would say if you asked James Anderson, the world's best swing bowler in Test cricket, he'd likely say he seems to get better swing in certain conditions and more often than not, they ...


-4

This is particularly topical given the England v Australia Ashes match is at Lord's in London where the teas, I have heard from professionals I've interviewed down the years, are meant to be amazing. As a spectator, I can vouch for their meat pies which are expensive but superb but as a player, I imagine it's really special. As has been said already, it will ...


-2

Has happened to me many times! At the non-striker's end, as your partner's face looms into view, you have to decide: do you stand your ground or sacrifice your own wicket by leaving your crease. Depends on who's the better batsman, who's scoring well etc.


-3

Good question! I'd say there's a limit to how much we should use, rather than could use, technology in sport. Example being referee-camera in rugby union's Six Nations. Offers a unique perspective at scrums but tends to be blurry and fast-moving and therefore an unpleasant viewing experience. I've bowled with those balls which have tech embedded to register ...


-1

Fast bowling is speed of abt 130-150 that most of bowlers like umesh yadav or dale styen do but medium fast is speed above 120 and within 135 like zaheer khan


0

Simple... to achieve consistent a good line and length and to trouble the batter. The good length will put doubt in the batters mind to come forward or back plus with the bowler closer to them at the point of release can intimidate them. If they trained and then played with their front foot much further back then the batter will have time to adjust and to ...


0

Historically runouts have not been recorded in cricket, however the good people at the ACS have gone through the old newspaper reports and attributed runouts retroactively to players, although the ICC do not recognise these, they are largely respected by scorers. In modern T20 International [and most domestic] Cricket, which has largely been televised, it ...


3

Technically possible, you could mount a small wireless camera in the ball but and something similar in the bat. However in the ball it would only be able to face in one direction and there would be no gaurentee that would be of any interest. The repeated impact forces would probably destroy it fairly quickly, and it would also alter the weight of the ball ...


3

This would count as LBW above the stumps but in line wicket to wicket is acceptable. The height is only used to judge whether the ball is hitting the stumps. see [36.1.d] https://www.lords.org/mcc/laws-of-cricket/laws/law-36-leg-before-wicket/ which directly addresses this. Ben


1

If the non-striker doesn't leave his crease, then the striker is out. See clause 3 of Law 38 - run out



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