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May
10
comment Do football teams have to do their best to win?
Another good example is from the swedish top tier "Allsvenskan" a couple of years back. In the last game day, Elfsborg were going to be champions if they won their home game against Djurgården. In case of a loss or a draw, AIK was going to be champions (given that they won their fixture). However, Djurgården and AIK are both bitter rivals from Stockholm, so the Djurgården fans were shouting (loosely translated) "Love Djurgården, go Elfsborg". It was simply more important for them that AIK did not become champions, than that they won the game. Just a piece of interesting trivia!
May
4
comment Can a goalie handle a headed pass which that player kicked up to himself?
In my opinion, the difference would be that in the first example above, the goalie is already allowed to use his hands. Thus, I wouldn't consider it trickery. In the second example, however, he's not allowed to use his hands (and that shouldn't change until an opponent has actively played, or at least touched, the ball). Hence, I would call it trickery. Anyway, the foul itself should come down to the intention of the play. However, it's a fairly complex question, and I don't think the laws of the game has any good answers. Interpretations on such vague grounds will always differ! :)
May
4
comment Can a goalie handle a headed pass which that player kicked up to himself?
probably still caution the same player as before (the one actually trying to play it to the keeper), but I'm not 100% sure. I am, however, quite sure that the rule applies when it's more than one player involved, as it's certainly a way of circumventing the laws of the game, and that kind of behaviour has to be dealt with. Consider a scenario where the goalie has the ball at his feet, not in a position to pick it up. If he'd then flick it to a team mate, so that he can head it back - that has to be a violation. I'm quite sure this scenario appeared in a "referee-test" a couple of years ago.
May
4
comment Can a goalie handle a headed pass which that player kicked up to himself?
You'd probably still caution the same player as before (the one actually trying to play it to the keeper), but I'm not 100% sure. I am, however, quite sure that the rule applies when it's more than one player involved, as it's certainly a way of circumventing the laws of the game, and that kind of behaviour has to be dealt with. Consider a scenario where the goalie has the ball at his feet, not in a position to pick it up. If he'd then flick it to a team mate, so that he can head it back - that has to be a violation. I'm quite sure this scenario appeared in a "referee-test" a couple of years a
May
4
comment Why do so many soccer stadiums use racing seats for their team benches?
... and Bayern Munich ;)
May
3
comment Can a goalie handle a headed pass which that player kicked up to himself?
To add to your answer, I'm fairly confident that the same rule applies when two players "collaborate" in circumventing the laws of the game. In this scenario, that would mean that the rule applies also when a team mate (could even be the keeper) passes/flicks the ball to another, so that he/she can head it to the keeper. Also, if I'm not mistaken, shouldn't the punishment include a yellow card as well?
Apr
2
awarded  Yearling
Jan
22
comment How is offside determined in Soccer?
Oops, I realize now that we actually agree. Sorry for that :)
Jan
22
comment How is offside determined in Soccer?
Yeah, I realized that - but my point is that the direction of the pass is irrelevant :) The only thing that matter is whether or not you're in an offside position when the ball is passed/deflected.
Jan
22
comment How is offside determined in Soccer?
An attacking player is NOT in an offside position when: (1) on his own teams half, or on the half-way line, (2) when further away from the opposition's goalline than the second to last defender & (3) when further away from the opposition's goalline than the ball. These three things are the only ones that count when determining whether or not an attacker is in an offside position (with the exception of throw-ins, goal-kicks and corner kicks).
Dec
31
answered What to look for in a new squash racket
Oct
31
comment Why do female footballers play a higher number of international matches compared to a male footballer?
Hmm, that is a little bit wierd. I've seen those stats as well, but I can't figure out why it is so. Generally, women's careers are shorter, due to a higher (average) number of injuries (especially knee injuries are overrepresented amongst women) and the fact that some choose to end their careers early to create families. Perhaps it could have something to do with the rapid development of the sport to do? Women might get the chance to represent their national teams earlier in their careers? Good question!
Sep
30
comment Offside when the ball was last played by the defending team
+1 for a great answer. I'd like to add though, that in the first situation (the same applies for the second, even though it may not be as clear) the attacker is not offside because the situation in which he was has passed. You're not offside if you don't interfere, and when the goalkeeper has the ball under control - the situation is over.
Sep
10
answered What are importance technical differences between a squash forehand and a tennis forehand?
Jul
26
comment Has there been any punishment for taunting opponents in a top division football game?
Just to make it clear; "unsporting behaviour" does not necessarily have to be aimed towards a person (opponent, team mate, referee, supporters, et cetera). It can also be against the game itself, for example by trying to circumvent (spelling?) the rules of the game. As an example, consider the situation when a wants to play the ball back to the keeper. It has happened that players juggle the ball and then play it back with their head (as that's usually allowed), but this is clearly a way of avoiding the rule. Thus, the player will be given a yellow card, and an indirect free kick will be given
Jul
24
comment Ball crosses the goal line but is caught by the keeper
Your analogy is good as well, and I do not have any criticism of it! As for the cube analogy, of course the "mental" cube has to be drawn with one face parallel to ground - and also parallel to the goal line. However, the cube shouldn't be imagined as something that rotates at all. Rather, it must always stay firm. The ball on the other hand, which is (almost completely) spherical can rotate all it wants, since it does so inside the cube. Really, the sphere would meet the cube in exactly six spots, so it would create a little friction - but that tiny detail must be ignored ;)
Jul
23
comment Ball crosses the goal line but is caught by the keeper
For clarity, it could be added that "wholly crossed" does not simply mean that you can see green grass between the ball and the goal line (as that is not necessarily a goal). To understand when a ball has crossed the line, one can imagine the ball as a cube, rather than a ball. The whole cube must be over the line in order for it to be counted as a goal. +1 for a great answer though!
Jul
22
answered Man of The Match in Football
Jul
21
answered Football score swapping: is it ok?
Jul
16
comment Where does the assistant referee watch to realize when a soccer player is offside?
It should also be added that, apart from in the top divisions, the assistant referee can also use his/her hearing as a compliment to peripheral vision. The sound of a boot hitting the ball is often quite recognizable, so it's often useful to listen - at least I did so when I was active as an assistant ref. +1 for a great answer!