3 Fixed interpretation.
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If read literally, this seems to indicate that as long asThis is a massive change in how offside position is determined for attackers leaving the ball has gone outfield of play or the defending team has cleared the ball towards halfway, outside of their penalty area,with very little explanation.

If an attacking player whoattacker has stepped offleft the field of play prior todeliberately, this means that even if they re-enter and place themselves in an onside position, may no longerthey will continue to be considered to be in an offside position - i.e. a ball could be played to the goal line for them to step onto the field to collect, and even if(unless the second-last defender is aton the goal line) until the defensive team clears the ball towards halfway, they'd still be able to play itoutside the penalty area.

However, I don't believe this is a sane interpretation. Here is how I, as a referee, and as far as I know, other referees will be applying this LawAlso:

An attackingA player may step or stay offwho deliberately leaves the field of play and re-enters without the referee’s permission and is not topenalised for offside and gains an advantage, must be involved in active playcautioned. If the player re-enters from the goal line and becomes involved in play before the next stoppage in play, or the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside their penalty area,

and in the Offside FAQ section:

Q6: How can an attacking player gain a non-offside advantage when returning to the field of play?

The player shall be considered to be positioned on the goal line forcould come back onto the purposesfield of offsideplay without the other team being aware and then receive a pass or make a challenge. 

It seems to meThis means that this is an editing error,if a player who has left the field deliberately re-enters the field of play and involves themselves in active play before the entire second sentence was copied fromball has been played by the preceding paragraphdefending team towards halfway, out of the penalty area, and they are (about defenders offnot penalised for offside, they must be cautioned for re-entering the field of play), without checking that it made sense for attackerspermission. For defendersIf this occurs, it makes perfect sense; you need to know whenan indirect free kick is awarded to stop counting a defender behind the goal line for the purposes of offsidedefending team.

As always, as the number of defenders between an attacker andwho accidentally finds themselves carried off the goal line defines offside positionfield by a natural playing movement (e. Ifg. a challenge by an injured defender off the backopponent, or their momentum from a run) is not affected by either of these restrictions, provided that they re-enter the field remained counted for offside purposes indefinitely, this would bein a huge disadvantage to the defending teamtimely manner.

 

The restart location is no longer a problempoint of contention, as this has been simplified in the 2016/17 Laws:

If read literally, this seems to indicate that as long as the ball has gone out of play or the defending team has cleared the ball towards halfway, outside of their penalty area, an attacking player who has stepped off the field of play prior to this, may no longer be considered offside - i.e. a ball could be played to the goal line for them to step onto the field to collect, and even if the second-last defender is at halfway, they'd still be able to play it.

However, I don't believe this is a sane interpretation. Here is how I, as a referee, and as far as I know, other referees will be applying this Law:

An attacking player may step or stay off the field of play not to be involved in active play. If the player re-enters from the goal line and becomes involved in play before the next stoppage in play, or the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside their penalty area, The player shall be considered to be positioned on the goal line for the purposes of offside.

It seems to me that this is an editing error, and the entire second sentence was copied from the preceding paragraph (about defenders off the field of play), without checking that it made sense for attackers. For defenders, it makes perfect sense; you need to know when to stop counting a defender behind the goal line for the purposes of offside, as the number of defenders between an attacker and the goal line defines offside position. If an injured defender off the back of the field remained counted for offside purposes indefinitely, this would be a huge disadvantage to the defending team.

The restart location is no longer a problem, as this has been simplified in the 2016/17 Laws:

 

This is a massive change in how offside position is determined for attackers leaving the field of play, with very little explanation.

If an attacker has left the field deliberately, this means that even if they re-enter and place themselves in an onside position, they will continue to be considered to be in an offside position (unless the second-last defender is on the goal line) until the defensive team clears the ball towards halfway, outside the penalty area.

Also:

A player who deliberately leaves the field of play and re-enters without the referee’s permission and is not penalised for offside and gains an advantage, must be cautioned.

and in the Offside FAQ section:

Q6: How can an attacking player gain a non-offside advantage when returning to the field of play?

The player could come back onto the field of play without the other team being aware and then receive a pass or make a challenge. 

This means that if a player who has left the field deliberately re-enters the field of play and involves themselves in active play before the ball has been played by the defending team towards halfway, out of the penalty area, and they are not penalised for offside, they must be cautioned for re-entering the field of play without permission. If this occurs, an indirect free kick is awarded to the defending team.

As always, an attacker who accidentally finds themselves carried off the field by a natural playing movement (e.g. a challenge by an opponent, or their momentum from a run) is not affected by either of these restrictions, provided that they re-enter the field in a timely manner.

 

The restart location is no longer a point of contention, as this has been simplified in the 2016/17 Laws:

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If read literally, this seems to indicate that as long as the ball has gone out of play or the defending team has cleared the ball towards halfway, outside of their penalty area, an attacking player who has stepped off the field of play prior to this, may no longer be considered offside - iei.e. a ball could be played to the goal line for them to step ononto the field to collectecollect, and even if the second-last defender is at halfway, they'd still be able to play it.

If read literally, this seems to indicate that as long as the ball has gone out of play or the defending team has cleared the ball towards halfway, outside of their penalty area, an attacking player who has stepped off the field of play prior to this, may no longer be considered offside - ie. a ball could be played to the goal line for them to step on the field to collecte, and even if the second-last defender is at halfway, they'd still be able to play it.

If read literally, this seems to indicate that as long as the ball has gone out of play or the defending team has cleared the ball towards halfway, outside of their penalty area, an attacking player who has stepped off the field of play prior to this, may no longer be considered offside - i.e. a ball could be played to the goal line for them to step onto the field to collect, and even if the second-last defender is at halfway, they'd still be able to play it.

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This is a common problem with the 2016/17 Laws of the Game. The entire document was rewritten, and this was rushed through without seeking feedback from the global community of players, managers, referees and other officials for an extensive period, so contradictions occur, or entire sections appear unclear.

In Law 11.4:

An attacking player may step or stay off the field of play not to be involved in active play. If the player re-enters from the goal line and becomes involved in play before the next stoppage in play, or the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside their penalty area, the player shall be considered to be positioned on the goal line for the purposes of offside.

If read literally, this seems to indicate that as long as the ball has gone out of play or the defending team has cleared the ball towards halfway, outside of their penalty area, an attacking player who has stepped off the field of play prior to this, may no longer be considered offside - ie. a ball could be played to the goal line for them to step on the field to collecte, and even if the second-last defender is at halfway, they'd still be able to play it.

However, I don't believe this is a sane interpretation. Here is how I, as a referee, and as far as I know, other referees will be applying this Law:

An attacking player may step or stay off the field of play not to be involved in active play. If the player re-enters from the goal line and becomes involved in play before the next stoppage in play, or the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside their penalty area, The player shall be considered to be positioned on the goal line for the purposes of offside.

It seems to me that this is an editing error, and the entire second sentence was copied from the preceding paragraph (about defenders off the field of play), without checking that it made sense for attackers. For defenders, it makes perfect sense; you need to know when to stop counting a defender behind the goal line for the purposes of offside, as the number of defenders between an attacker and the goal line defines offside position. If an injured defender off the back of the field remained counted for offside purposes indefinitely, this would be a huge disadvantage to the defending team.

The restart location is no longer a problem, as this has been simplified in the 2016/17 Laws:

If an offside offence occurs, the referee awards an indirect free kick where the offence occurred, including if it is in the player’s own half of the field of play.

This means, the indirect free kick is taken from where the offside player touches the ball, or otherwise interferes with an opponent.

If an offside-positioned, attacking player off the field somehow manages to interfere with an opponent (I see this as fairly unlikely), an indirect free kick is awarded on the field of play, closest to where the offence occurred.

Law 11.4:

If an attacking player remains stationary between the goalposts and inside the goal as the ball enters the goal, a goal must be awarded unless the player commits an offside offence or Law 12 offence in which case play is restarted with an indirect or direct free kick.

Law 12.4:

... However, if a player leaves the field of play as part of play and commits an offence against another player, play is restarted with a free kick taken on the boundary line nearest to where the offence occurred ...

Law 13.2:

... free kicks for offences involving a player entering, re-entering or leaving the field of play without permission are taken from the position of the ball when play was stopped. However, if a player leaves the field of play as part of play and commits an offence against another player, play is restarted with a free kick taken on the boundary line nearest to where the offence occurred ...

If this puts the restart location inside the goal area, the restart may be taken from any point within the goal area.

Law 13.2:

... free kicks to the defending team in their goal area may be taken from anywhere in that area ...