Lucky loser used to be chosen as the highest ranked players among unsuccessful finalist of qualifying competition. Not so long ago ATP changed this rule in such way that lucky loser is chosen randomly from the highest ranked finalists. (Which means that no player can be sure that he will be lucky loser.) See, for example, here.

What are the rules for WTA tournaments? Is there a draw among highest ranked players - as in ATP tournaments - or does the WTA still use the old system, i.e., the highest ranked finalist is automatically lucky loser (if there is a spot available).

As of 2015, lucky loser in the WTA tournaments is still determined as the highest ranked player. See 2015 WTA Official Rulebook (internet archive):

C. DRAWS / 1. Singles Main Draw / a. Composition

v. Lucky Losers

The criterion for determining Lucky Loser status is determined first by the highest ranked players (in descending order) who have lost in the final round of Qualifying. (The ranking used to determine the Lucky Loser order is the same ranking used to determine the Qualifying seeding.)* If more Lucky Losers are required, the same procedure is followed for players who have lost in the second-to-last round of Qualifying, in descending rank order.

UPDATE

The rules changed in 2016. Here is an excerpt from 2016 WTA Official Rulebook (internet archive):

C. DRAWS / 1. Singles Main Draw / a. Composition

v. Lucky Losers

... If there is one vacancy in the Main Draw before Qualifying is completed, then the order of the two (2) highest ranked Lucky Losers shall be randomly drawn, and thereafter the order shall follow the Lucky Losers’ rankings, unless there are two (2) or more withdrawals at the time Qualifying is completed in which case the size of the random draw will be the number of withdrawals plus one (1)

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