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I know that FC is short for Football Club, but does basketball have such word for teams? I primarily am asking this, because of a new game I am developing. I ask the player to enter the name of his team, should I put "Miami Heat" or "Miami Heat BC"

  • Welcome to Sports SE. Are you asking if there is a BC, for example? – user527 Aug 5 '15 at 13:14
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    Yes that is what i was asking for, i am making a sports game so i need to research a bit! – McLinux Aug 5 '15 at 13:42
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    In Belgium there is BC (Telenet) Oostende, and there have been/are a few others with BC in their name. But a quick search on Wikipedia gives me the impression that it is not that common. Especially if compared with FC for football. Other sports I don't know, but you should just look up some national divisions and look at team names. – Don_Biglia Aug 6 '15 at 6:51
  • What do you mean by "other sports" ? Which are important? By the way, the MCC is quite a big thing in cricket: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marylebone_Cricket_Club – Fil-let's GoFundMonica Aug 6 '15 at 8:31
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    @McLinux I think that mentioning your motivation in the question would improve your post. (And it would be more visible there than it is in a comment.) – Martin Aug 6 '15 at 12:19
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There are also those initials:

  • A.S. (Associazione Sportiva - A.S. Roma or Association Sportive - AS Douanes)

  • S.S. (Società Sportiva - S.S. Lazio) => football - paddle - grass hockey - basketball - volleyball - rugby - darts and many more

  • A.C. (Associazione Calcio - A.C. Milan)

  • U.C. (Unione Calcio - U.C. Sampdoria)

  • S.C. (Sport Club - Vasas SC)

  • RCD (Real Club Deportivo - RCD Espanyol)

  • C.D. (Club Deportivo - CD Aguila)

  • C.A. (Club Atlético - C.A. Cerro)

  • I.F.K (Idrottsföreningen Kamraterna - IFK Göteborg / IFK Norrköping)

  • CSKA (Central Army Sports Club - CSKA Moscow) => football - futsal - icehochey - basketball - volleyball

see also wikipedia

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    Since the OP mentioned that they are interested in this because of game they are programming, I guess that the Wikipedia link you provided might be very useful to them. – Martin Aug 6 '15 at 9:38
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    Since the OP is asking about sports other than football/soccer I'm not sure how this list of football teams is relevant... – kuhl Aug 6 '15 at 12:10
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    @kuhl I correct the answer because many of those societies has team in more than one sport (e.g. CSKA Moscow basket), so now it reply better at the answer – Ale Aug 6 '15 at 12:25
  • @Ale my point is I don't see how Manchester United (which AFAIK is only a soccer team) applies in this situation. Agreed about CSKA, Real Madrid would be another example of two sports sharing the same club name. – kuhl Aug 6 '15 at 12:29
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    @Ale removed my downvote. Would probably be useful to include which sports each club plays as well. – kuhl Aug 6 '15 at 13:32
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After a bit of googling you can find some clubs with similar shortcuts in the name:

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    This has some potential for a good answer, however it'd be nice to see what sports these are related to, with better formatting. Right now it's just a jumble of links and some of the team names are football/soccer teams, which would not answer the OPs question. – kuhl Aug 6 '15 at 12:13
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    @kuhl It's a community wiki, would you care to contribute? – user527 Sep 11 '15 at 13:11
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    OTOH I do not know how to reformat it in a much better way. Everything is linked there, so if the asker wants to find more about those shortcuts, they can click and look. – Martin Sep 11 '15 at 13:14
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    @edmastermind29 this was a month and a half ago. Why revive this? I didn't down vote martin, I gave constructive criticism. – kuhl Sep 11 '15 at 13:26
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    @kuhl fair observation, but I don't see how that's related to improving the answer for the benefit of the community. – user527 Sep 11 '15 at 13:35
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FC itself is actually quite common in another sport: Rugby. "XXX Rugby Football Club" is commonly the name of rugby clubs (at the club level). This is true even in the US (where "Club" is not a very common term); in Chicago, for example, we have the Chicago Lions Rugby Football Club, Lincoln Park RFC, etc.

In US-primary sports, "Club" is used sporadically, but usually not as the primary descriptor. Many teams do technically call themselves clubs, though, via their official corporation; the Chicago Cubs Baseball Club LLC for example; Chicago Bears Football Club Inc, etc. However, they're not usually described using those words - it's just "Chicago Bears". That's because of the prevalence of team names in US-primary sports; you need to say "Manchester City Football Club" because there might also be "Manchester City Rugby Football Club" and "Manchester City Cricket Club". In the US, and thus in sports that originated or came to popularity in the US, team names ("Chicago Bears", etc.) are more common and therefore don't need to have the sport added on to differentiate them.

So, my suggestion would be that if you're expecting a US audience, simply use team names; but if you're expecting a primarily European audience and not giving teams names (beyond their home city), "basketball club" is perfectly reasonable.

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Basketball Club and local-language-appropriate equivalent phrases are relatively common among European teams, especially those that are not basketball divisions of a larger sports club. North American teams, on the other hand, invariably (I think) use the template Location Moniker.

If the teams in your game are going to be based on the actual teams, then probably you should use the actual names of the teams (in this particular case, Miami Heat, period), provided that there are no legal provisions against that. This is something you should consult with a specialized lawyer.

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Well, in basketball in the Spanish league Barcelona FC gets their name from La Liga (the Spanish football league).

Source:1

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