If during a ATP / WTA / Grand slam tennis tournament, rain falls consistently for the entire 2 weeks, would the tournament just be cancelled? Has this ever happened in a grand slam? Is there an actual rule to say when a tournament would be abandoned due to rain or would they just keep waiting till the rain stops?

For questions of this type, it seems reasonable to create a CW answer where various users can contribute the instances they are aware of, add references, etc. (We will probably not create a complete list, but at least we will have some of them.)

List of tournaments cancelled due to rain

  • Doubles competition at 1987 Dow Chemical Classic (Birmingham) was cancelled due to rain before completion of the first round matches.

List of tournaments unfinished due to rain

Grand Slams

Grand Prix tennis circuit

Grand Prix tennis circuit was a predecessor of ATP Tour.

  • At 1974 Viceroy Classic (Honk Kong), neither singles nor doubles competition were finished. See Wikipedia page on 1974 Grand Prix.
  • At the 1976 Nottingham Open both singles and doubles competition remained unfinished. (Source: 1, 1a.) A similar situation repeated at the same tournament a year later, in 1977. (Sources: 1, 1a)
  • The final of 1977 Peugeot Open (Johanessburg) was not played. See Wikipedia article on 1977 Grand Prix. (However, I did not find some source with explanation of the reason for cancelling. So it's possible that in this case it was not weather-related.)
  • Final of the 1980 Congoleum Classic (Indian Wells) was not played due to rain. Doubles competition was cancelled after the first round.
  • The 1981 Monte Carlo Open singles final was abandoned due to rain.
  • Both singles and doubles finals at 1987 Volvo International (Stratton Mountain) were cancelled due to rain. Sources: 1, 1a.

I will add that the final of 1984 ABN World Tennis Tournament was unfinished, too. But the reasons had nothing to do with weather, the final was cancelled after an anonymous bomb thread. Other sources: 1, 1a

ATP Tour

WTA Tour

  • I was considering whether to add * List of Grand Slam finals postponed due to rain* as well, but that list would probably too long. (But if somebody thinks it would be a good thing, you can go ahead and make such list. Maybe as a separate answer?) – Martin Feb 18 '16 at 17:19

ATP/WTA tournaments last one week, only Grand Slam ones last two weeks.

Tournaments schedule are planned to manage weather problems, sometimes it happened that a player has played two singles match the same day.

In history never happened that a Grand Slam tournament was totally abandoned by weather. You can check the list of men and women winners.

But it happened that ATP/WTA tournaments delay a lot and the final was played on monday (i.e Wimbledon 1919, 1922, 2001)

No major (a.k.a grand slam) tournament has ever been cancelled due to bad weather. I've never heard of any standard one week tournament being cancelled due to bad weather, either. Since tennis tournaments are held all over the world, they tend to be scheduled during times when the weather is good in whatever part of the world the tournament is being held. For example - Paris in late May/early June for the French Open, where you might get a little bit of rain but it's generally good weather. Some other examples are the Australian Open in January during the Australian summer when it's hot and sunny - the same thing with the Indian Wells Masters series event in March in the southern California desert when the weather is nice and warm.

The US Open had a streak where for 4 straight years the men's final was delayed until the following Monday because it rained on the final Sunday. That is how most weather delays for majors are handled - the matches will just be delayed until the weather is good enough to play. It has, however, prompted the USTA to construct a roof over Arthur Ashe stadium recently because of the delays weather has caused over the years.

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