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Which team in EPL history has overcome the highest point deficit(at equal or more games played than teams at 1st position) to win the league (and what was the deficit)?

The deficit could be at any time in the league, but there will be a point where it would be the highest with equal games played with the club at 1st position.

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As @red_devil226 pointed out, Newcastle United were 12 points clear of Manchester United in 1995/1996, both having played 23 games, but finished 3 points behind them. Here is the league table from 21 January 1996.

Newcastle 12 point lead table

As a close second: in 1997/1998, Manchester United were 11 points clear of Arsenal, both having played 22 games, but finished 1 point behind them. Here is the league table from 17 January 1998. Manchester 11 point lead table

Similarly to the answer from @red_devil226, I only considered the Premier League era.

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  • Yes I was looking for Premier League era only... just out of curiosity though... does the answer remain the same if the question were to be asked for entire history (3 point game) for 1st tier english league? I can ask another question if it isnt... – Gaurav Oct 29 '15 at 11:03
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    @Gaurav. I think so, but am not sure. 3 point rule came in in 1981/1982, and most of the time in the 80s either Liverpool or Everton won clearly. The best I could find was Liverpool being in 12th !! place in Christmas 1981, and 8 points behind Ipswich having played one game more. statto.com/football/stats/england/division-one-old/1981-1982/… – Fillet Oct 29 '15 at 11:27
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Manchester United over came a 12 point deficit to Newcastle United to win the 1995/96 Premiership by 7 points. I should mention that the English Premier League, also known as the Premiership, started only in 1992 (i.e., the first season was the 1992/93 season). Before that it was just known as English First Division League. The answer I have given is only for the Premier League era.

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