6

So recently, there has been this incident where a batsmen was out due to a mankad (http://www.news.com.au/sport/cricket/cricket-greats-slam-mankad-dismissal-at-u19-cricket-world-cup/news-story/e4134bb470e2482f0a17dc4dedba6c1f)

Having read what it actually is, I don't really understand why it's against the spirit of the game. I mean, it's a legitimate dismissal within the rules of cricket and it's fairly easy to avoid being dismissed this way by just not trying to leaving the crease to get a headstart before the ball is bowled.

It seems to be the cricket version of getting out while trying to steal a base (in baseball). Why is there so much outrage about it?

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    This is a very fair question, but also one that I think will be very difficult to answer without allowing personal opinion to intrude. I've therefore edited the question to make it more neutral and open-ended. I'd also like to make a plea for answers to explain why the controversy exists, rather than whether it should exist. – Spinner Feb 20 '16 at 13:31
5

It is considered to be ungentelmaly conduct and sharp practice which is against the spirit of cricket.

There are different types of mankad in my opinion as an umpire. The one in the u19 world Cup the bowler was never going to deliver the ball and no warning was given. Also the batsmen was not stealing a run.

There have been other cases including Jos Butler over the summer where the batsmen was 3 or 4 ft down and could be argued to be stealing run. He was also warned.

As an umpire what I have discussed with my colleagues is that if the batsmen is approaching the 4ft marker he is stealing a run and I will warn him and should be be run out I will have no issue with the dismissal. However in the situation in the u19 world Cup I would be with my colleague having a chat with the fielding captain as to the appeal and whether he wants it to stand.

I believe there may be changes coming in the next law rewrite to deal with this.

Ben

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    For what it's worth, the umpire in the U19 WC did ask the fielding captain about whether the appeal should stand. – Philip Kendall Feb 20 '16 at 14:04

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