8

This question already has an answer here:

Consider this situation :

A short boundary behind the wicket and the pitch is having an extra(or abnormal) bounce. A fast bowler bowls a bouncer which flies over the keeper and lands outside the boundary.

Will this be given as 6 runs ?

Was there any incident like this in the history of cricket?

marked as duplicate by Fillet, Ale, TrueDub, Philip Kendall, Joe Feb 29 '16 at 20:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • It's hard to find dupes here :/ I searched for dupes but found none.May be because other question is about intentionally bowling a six and mine is about accidentally , Anyway it is a duplicate. – Arun Xavier Mar 1 '16 at 3:48
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This is a highly unusual case but I have seen it happen in local recreational cricket from a bouncer.

The correct decision for this is to award 4 byes. Boundary 6 can only be scored from the bat.

from Law 19 5c ,

A Boundary 6 will be scored if and only if the ball has been struck by the bat and pitches beyond the boundary.

  • While 4runs may be correct , it will also be taken as wide or as no-ball , so there will be an additional run , hence total will be 5runs. – Prem Feb 29 '16 at 11:25
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    This is not gaurenteed it is possible for it to happen without being either wide or no ball. – Ben Whyall Feb 29 '16 at 11:47
  • @BenWhyll Yesterday, in ENG vs BAN Jofra Archer bowled out Tamim Iqbal and the ball went directly over the keeper's head to six and ICC in their twitter handle posted "Have you ever seen a ball go for 'six' after hitting the stumps?" Did they just say it for the sake of posting it and gain views or they really mean it? – Ajay Singh Negi Jun 9 at 3:23
  • @jay they are just trying to get views as you suggest. Also I would be surprised if the ICC Twitter account is run by someone who knows the laws. This is rare so people won't have seen it. – Ben Whyall Jun 9 at 9:28
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This is a highly exceptional case. There is no record of this having occurred in any professional cricket match. If a ground has such a short boundary behind the wicket, it cannot be used for professional cricket. If a pitch causes such abnormal bounce, it will be deemed dangerous and the match will be called off.

As Ben Whyall mentions, the ball needs to strike the bat for it to be given a 6.

  • Hi, as per my answer and the link a boundary 6 may only be scored from the bat. – Ben Whyall Feb 29 '16 at 9:03
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    @BenWhyall Ah! I should do some better research. Edited that part out! – ʀᴇᴅ_ᴅᴇᴠɪʟ226 Feb 29 '16 at 19:57

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