10

I saw in an Olympics table tennis match a Chinese athlete being given a red card. I think she lost the point but I'm not too sure.

So why would would some receive a red/yellow card in table tennis and what are the consequences of receiving one?

4

Yellow and red cards were first introduced into the game of table tennis in 1991. Yellow & Red cards
Yellow and red cards are shown by umpires and referees to players and coaches who break the rules or misbehave during the course of a match or tournament.

Rule 3.05 covers the area of discipline in table tennis, and it applies to both players and coaches.

The first part of this table tennis rule deals with coaches giving advice to players, Advice is only allowed to be given by a coach during the intervals between games or during other authorised suspensions of play.

So if advice is given at any other time, the umpire will hold up a yellow card and warn the coach that any further offence will result in his dismissal from the playing area. If the coach again gives advice illegally during the same match, the umpire will hold up a red card and send the coach away from the playing area.

If this happens during a team match, and ANY authorised person gives advice to the player after a yellow card has been shown, the umpire will hold up a red card and send him away from the playing area, whether or not he was the person previously warned.
In a team match, the dismissed adviser is not allowed to return, except where he is required to play, and cannot be replaced by another adviser until the team match has ended.

The second part of this table tennis rule deals with misbehaviour by players and coaches.

The rules state that players and coaches must refrain from behaviour which may unfairly affect an opponent, offend spectators or bring the sport into disrepute.
Examples of this are - abusive language, deliberately breaking the ball or hitting it out of the playing area, kicking the table or surrounds and disrespect of match officials.

Yellow cards are designed for less serious offences but if a player or coach commits a serious offence, the umpire must suspend play and report it immediately to the referee.
However, for less serious offences the umpire may, on the first occasion, hold up a yellow card and warn the offender that any further offence is liable to incur penalties.

If the player then commits a second offence in the same individual match or team match, the umpire will award 1 point to the offender's opponent. And for a third offence he will award 2 points, each time holding up a yellow and a red card together.

If a player continues to misbehave after three offences in the same individual match or team match, the umpire will suspend play and report it immediately to the referee.
If the coach continues to misbehave after receiving a yellow card, the umpire will hold up a red card and send the coach away from the playing area.

Source

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.