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I'm fairly new at running. I really enjoy it but definitely wouldn't consider myself very serious about it. I ran a couple 5k races and a 10k race last year. I'd like to increase both my 5k and my 10k pace and also prepare to possibly run a half marathon later this year. What types of cross-training would be effective in helping to increase 5k/10k pace as well as the pace I'm able to run at in general?

What are some of the more effective types of cross-training for increasing running pace?

closed as off topic by wax eagle, Marcus Swope, jamauss, Tonny Madsen, Ste Jul 30 '12 at 10:28

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    This needs a lot more context to be a viable question. – corsiKa Feb 9 '12 at 21:42
  • Fits better in F&N – Tonny Madsen Feb 10 '12 at 11:33
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    Before this question gets closed and before anybody else votes it down, consider - there was a Running site proposal on Area 51 which was merged into this proposal. If I'm not mistaken, this question would fit squarely within that site's scope, no? Please if you're voting to close give a better reason than, "I don't think it fits in this site" - why? – Zannjaminderson Feb 10 '12 at 16:11
  • Again - why the unexplained downvotes? – Zannjaminderson Feb 14 '12 at 17:32
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    @TonnyMadsen Your reasoning is not valid. If you feel it is, then F&N should be rolled into Sports as it's more broad. This is why my original running proposal was a separate proposal. – Jason N. Gaylord Feb 16 '12 at 15:14
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You should try weight lifting on rest days; squats specifically.

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    This question is a subjective one; there potentially unlimited correct answers. In that light, the answers to the question should meet what is set forth by the "good subjective/bad subjective" guidelines. Answers tend to: explain why/how, be longer than shorter, be impartial, share experiences over opinion, and backed up by facts and references. See more here. – corsiKa Feb 10 '12 at 1:42

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