4

This might not be the correct community so I can close/move my question.

I'm just curious. Do student athletes attending religious universities need to be of that faith? I can think of several universities (BYU, Notre Dame, Liberty, etc.) which are religious but I'm curious if they need to be of that faith. If the school limits that all students/student athletes are of that faith, that would limit the pool of athletes they could recruit, which would put them at a competitive disadvantage.

  • 1
    I would say this is off-topic because it's about the procedure of law more so than sports. If you weren't asking about athletes (but college employees for example), the answer remains the same. – user527 Dec 12 '16 at 4:40
3

Do athletes attending religious colleges (BYU, ND, etc.) need to be of that faith?

No, because of federal law. BYU has a nondiscrimination statement that states the following (emphasis mine, based on your question):

... Therefore admission preference is reserved for members of the Church in good standing; however, as required by federal law (including Title IX and Section 504), BYU does not unlawfully discriminate against applicants for admission or employment based upon sex, race, creed, religion, national origin, age, or disability who meet the requirements; ...

2

The answer is no, students do not need to be of that faith.

What is true about the "religious" colleges is that they are sponsored by churches of that faith. And perhaps "faith" is a "tiebreaker" when choosing between applicants. As a practical matter, good athletes are scarce enough so that "athlete" trumps "faith."

But the U.S. government will not provide Federal funding to schools that limit enrollments to one faith. One college, Bob Jones University, tried to impose certain (non-religious) limitations on enrollment, and lost its Federal funding.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.