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The Los Angeles Dodgers and Pittsburgh Pirates tied 0-0 at the end of the 9th inning on August 23rd 2017. With one out and a runner on the second base, the pirates had a chance to win the game with no hits in the 9th. Dodgers' pitcher Rich Hill went on to throw a no hitter game through 9 innings.

The commentators mentioned that winning without a hit is a rarity, so I'm wondering how many times it has happened in MLB history.

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From an ESPN article and MLB article about a game between the Dodgers and Angels played in 2008:

The final score was 1-0, marking the fifth time since 1900 that a team did not get a hit but won the game.

Complete List:

  Cnt Date          Tm   Opp GmReslt  PA  AB  R  H 2B 3B HR RBI BB IBB SO HBP SH SF ROE GDP SB CS LOB Batrs
+----+-------------+---+----+-------+---+---+--+--+--+--+--+---+--+---+--+---+--+--+---+---+--+--+---+-----+
    1 1992-04-12(1) CLE  BOS W  2-1   32  25  2  0  0  0  0   2  7   0  6   0  0  0   1   0  6  1   6     9 

    2 1990-07-01    CHW  NYY W  4-0   31  26  4  0  0  0  0   0  5   0  3   0  0  0   3   0  1  1   3    11 

    3 1967-04-30(1) DET @BAL W  2-1   40  24  2  0  0  0  0   0 10   1  3   2  4  0   1   1  1  0  11    14 

    4 1964-04-23    CIN @HOU W  1-0   31  29  1  0  0  0  0   0  2   0  9   0  0  0   2   0  0  0   3    10 

    5 2008-06-28    LAD  LAA W  1-0   29  24  1  0  0  0  0   1  3   0  9   1  0  1   1   0  1  0   4    13 

Source: Baseball Reference (Included code is of respective website.)

Wikipedia article on these win:

five times a team has been no-hit and still won the game: two notable victories occurred when the Cincinnati Reds defeated the Houston Colt .45s (now called the Houston Astros) 1–0 on April 23, 1964 even though they were no-hit by Houston starter Ken Johnson, and the Detroit Tigers defeated the Baltimore Orioles 2–1 on April 30, 1967 even though they were no-hit by Baltimore starter Steve Barber and reliever Stu Miller.

Another list that may be helpful from Baseball Reference.

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