3

Could someone confirm the following discrepancy which appears to be a difference between EPL and EFL relegation rules in event of a tie on points, goal-difference, and goals-scored?

From potentially unreliable secondary sources (beginning with a W) it seems that head-to-head performance is taken into account in the EFL before a playoff match for relegation. In the EPL it seems that head-to-head is not taken into account, and it proceeds straight to a playoff.

Is this correct? Can anyone quote chapter and verse? (Secondarily, why is there a difference, if there is one?)

(In case you're wondering why anyone would care, yes this is for a maths problem, not an anxiety about any particular team).

  • Related, but only refers to EPL sports.stackexchange.com/questions/4626/… – Dan Sheppard Sep 1 '17 at 18:08
  • I doubt that anyone will be able to answer this part: "why is there a difference, if there is one?". The answer is "because it is defined to be so". Apart from that you have perfectly answered (+1) your question (+1), so you should accept it. – gdrt Sep 1 '17 at 21:40
3

It looks like there is a real difference here.

EPL Rule C17 (download link, page 108):

If at the end of the Season either the League Champions or the Clubs to be relegated or the question of qualification for other competitions cannot be determined because two or more Clubs are equal on points, goal difference and goals scored, the Clubs concerned shall play off one or more deciding League Matches on neutral grounds, the format, timing and venue of which shall be determined by the Board.

EFL Rule 9.2:

If two or more Clubs have the same number of points, goal difference and goals scored the highest placed Club shall be determined by the respective League records against each other, taking into account in order of precedence, points gained, goal difference and goals scored. If the above procedures do not separate the Clubs, then the Clubs concerned shall play off a deciding League Match or Matches under arrangements approved by the Board on a neutral ground.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.