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When a player crosses fifty runs, it is called a half century, and is recorded in the batsman's records. When a player crosses one hundred runs, it is a century, and is also recorded in the batsman's records.

But, to cross one hundred runs the player must have crossed fifty runs first.

What happens to the previous half century recorded, when the player completes a century as well?

Are they both recorded? Is the half century discarded and only the century recorded?

Similarly, what is the recording procedure when a player who scored a century goes on to score a double century?

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From Wikipedia article "Cricket statistics":

  • Centuries (100): The number of innings in which the batsman scored one hundred runs or more.

  • Half-centuries (50): The number of innings in which the batsman scored fifty to ninety-nine runs (centuries do not count as half-centuries as well).

Again, from Wikipedia article "Century":

Scores of more than 200 runs are still statistically counted as a century, although these scores are referred as double (200–299 runs), triple (300–399 runs), and quadruple centuries (400–499 runs), and so on.

So, when a player completes a century, half-century is discarded and only the century recorded. And if a player scores a double century it is still recorded as a century.


For example: In One Day International form of cricket Sachin Tendulkar has 49 centuries, 96 half-centuries.

Using Statsguru Sachin has scored between 0 to 99, 96 times and scored 100+ 49 times, which makes it clear that centuries is not counted as half-centuries otherwise Sachin would have 145 half-centuries.

Again, Sachin has scored between 100 to 199, 48 times and scored 200+ 1 times, which makes it clear that double centuries is also recorded as century.

  • Presumably Wikipedia has cited an original source that supports the claim "half centuries are discarded when a century is scored in the same innings". Please provide that source directly, or, if the claim is not supported by a credible source, remove it. – Nij Jan 18 '18 at 22:33
  • @Nij Sir, I also had doubt about using wikipedia link answer without sources on that link but I think added example will work as a good source, let me know what you think about this edit. – Ram Chandra Giri Jan 19 '18 at 17:21

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