2

Suppose a team blocks an extra point. I realize that if the defense returns the ball to the end zone, it counts as a two-point score. However, what if the defense returns the ball to, say, the opposing 20-yard line? Is that the usual kickoff, or does the defense have the option to keep the ball at the 20?

I suspect that they don't, but I can't find any place that spells out the rule.

3

What happens if a team returns a blocked extra point a long way, but not all the way to the end zone?

The ball is considered dead, and the rules regarding what takes place after a try (a kickoff) is put into effect.


As posted here, an extra point is defined as a "try."

A specific rule reference for the NCAA regarding the results of a try can be found at Rule 8, Section 3, Article 2 (specifically point d2):

d. The try ends when:

  1. The ball is dead by rule (A.R. 8-3-2-IV and VI).

A specific rule reference for the NCAA regarding what takes place after a try can be found at Rule 8, Section 3, Article 6:

After a try, the ball shall be put in play by a kickoff or at the succeeding spot in extra periods. The team scoring the six-point touchdown shall kick off.


A specific rule reference for the NFL regarding the results of a try can be found at Rule 11, Section 3, Article 2 (specifically point e):

During a Try, the following shall apply:

(e) The Try ends when ... the ball is dead by rule.

A specific rule reference for the NFL regarding what takes place after a try can be found at Rule 3, Section 18, Article 5, Item 1:

A Kickoff is a kick that puts the ball in play at the start of each half, at the start of overtime, after each Try, and after a successful field goal.

3

There is no option to stay at the 20.

The outcomes of an extra point attempt are

  • scoring the extra point

  • returned for a safety by the defence

  • scoring a safety by the offence

Anything else is considered just a miss and play restarts as specified by the rules.

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