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Suppose an extra point gets blocked, and the defense returns it for two points. Who kicks off to whom? The defense who just scored the two points, or the offense who scored the TD?

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Suppose an extra point gets blocked, and the defense returns it for two points. Who kicks off to whom? The defense who just scored the two points, or the offense who scored the TD?

The offense who scored the TD.


The NCAA and NFL define an extra point attempt as a "try."

The NCAA defines a "try" in Rule 8, Section 3, Article 2:

A try is an opportunity for either team to score one or two points while the game clock is stopped after a touchdown.

The NFL defines a "try" in Rule 3, Section 41:

A Try is the attempt by a team that has scored a touchdown to add one point (by a field goal) or two points (by a touchdown) during one untimed scrimmage down.


Regarding who kicks off/receives the kickoff,

The NCAA says in Rule 8, Section 3, Article 6:

After a try, the ball shall be put in play by a kickoff or at the succeeding spot in extra periods. The team scoring the six-point touchdown shall kick off.

The NFL says in Rule 11, Section 3, Article 4:

"After a Try, the team on defense during the Try shall receive the kickoff."

  • "Try" is the concept I'm looking for. The etymology is interesting, I'm finding. Originally in rugby, grounding the ball in the end zone didn't score in and of itself, but gave the opportunity to kick through the goalposts for a score. So, grounding the ball was a "try" for points, which were scored in a "conversion" if the kick were successful. The words "try" and "conversion" have been retained in rugby, although of course the scoring has changed. ... – BobRodes Aug 30 '18 at 19:34
  • ... In American football, the word "touchdown" comes from the rugby requirement of touching the ball down, which rugby still retains, although we of course no longer do. We still have our "two-point conversion," and it seems that a "try" in the rules retains its original meaning as well. Very interesting. Thanks for finding the rule. – BobRodes Aug 30 '18 at 19:35
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This happened in the Texas vs. Notre Dame game in 2016. I had a look at it, and the team that scored the TD kicks off. Which seems fair.

https://youtu.be/Xj170hxx708?t=2h34m16s

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