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Ball hits elbow or below elbow of batsman and raises in the air. The ball is then directly caught by fielder. Is he out or not?

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Almost certainly not out. Refer to Law 33.1 "Out Caught"

The striker is out Caught if a ball delivered by the bowler, not being a No ball, touches his/her bat without having previously been in contact with any fielder, and is subsequently held by a fielder as a fair catch

and Law 5.6.2 "Contact with the ball"

contact between the ball and any of 5.6.2.1 to 5.6.2.4

5.6.2.1 the bat itself

5.6.2.2 the batsman’s hand holding the bat

5.6.2.3 any part of a glove worn on the batsman’s hand holding the bat

5.6.2.4 any additional materials permitted under 5.4

shall be regarded as the ball striking or touching the bat or being struck by the bat.

"The elbow" is not listed in any of the points in 5.6.2 so the ball does not count as having struck the bat, so the batsman cannot be out caught. The batsman could potentially be out LBW if the ball would have struck the wicket - despite the name, this does not have to involve the leg.

-2

If the batsmen is wearing an arm guard, and the ball hits the arm guard and caught he is adjudged out caught


Edit

It is listed below according to rule 5.6.2.4 additional materials

contact between the ball and any of 5.6.2.1 to 5.6.2.4

5.6.2.1 the bat itself

5.6.2.2 the batsman’s hand holding the bat

5.6.2.3 any part of a glove worn on the batsman’s hand holding the bat

5.6.2.4 any additional materials permitted under 5.4 shall be regarded as the ball striking or touching the bat or being struck by the bat.

  • Which law are you basing this answer on? – Philip Kendall May 8 at 6:41
  • @PhilipKendall 5.6.2.4 additional materials – akhil May 8 at 6:43
  • @PhilipKendall i have edited my answer to clarify your doubt – akhil May 8 at 6:54
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    5.4 refers to protective material on the bat itself, not protective equipment for the batsman. – Philip Kendall May 8 at 7:51

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