3

There are two scenarios in question here:

  1. Batsman extends and drags his bat to inside the crease. But just as he dragged in, he lost the bat from his hands and his whole body is still outside the crease. Fielder seizes the moment and tries to effect a run out.
  2. Batsman extends and drags his bat to inside the crease. He now wants to go for the next run, and just as he is about to leave the crease to do that, he loses the bat from his hands and his whole body is still outside the crease. Fielder seizes the moment and tries to effect a run out.

Is it OUT/NOT OUT in either/both the cases?

One thing I know here for sure is that the new 'bouncing bat rule' is not applicable here, because there is no contact with the bat and hands here.

2

The batsman is Out, run out in both cases.

In the first they have not made their ground as the bat is dropped before they have made their ground. In the second they have deliberately left it in order to continue running.

This can be determined using the conditions laid out in Law 30, Batsman out of his/her ground, and the remainder of Law 38, Run out.

  • Thanks. Can you give the reference to the relevant rule here? Also, in the first scenario, please note that the batsman had made his ground for a brief time, which is the cause of my confusion. – Roshan P Shajan Feb 13 at 17:11
  • The first scenario describes a batsman losing the bat as they are entering the crease, which suggests they have not made their ground first before dropping it. If they have made their ground and then dropped it, this is a different scenario. Please clarify the question. – Nij Feb 13 at 18:47

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