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I am riding a burton joystick 2011. Co2 bindings.

How far should bindings be set back when riding in powder?

Please note that the board has the burton channel.

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After some reading, I found some information that I hope you find useful.

Your board seems to be more of a park board rather than a speed/powder board. This is mostly due to your board having a decambered nose versus having a traditional nose. As you can see by the pictures below, a decambered nose doesn't have much of a lip compared to what a traditional nose does. Although most people will say that decambared lips are the way to go, it pretty obvious to see that the lip would help the board get over powder easier.

Traditional Nose

trad

Decambered Nose

decamb

After looking at what people had to say about the bindings, you are correct. Setting the bindings towards the back of the board will create more lift in the front that will allow you to cut through and stay above the powder better. I would suggest setting your bindings back anywhere from 1" - 2". Or follow this diagram...

enter image description here

Source

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    Additionally, remember that these are rough guidelines - there isn't a defined amount, in fact you don't need to set the bindings back at all, it just makes popping onto the surface of soft powder easier. – Rory Alsop Feb 6 '13 at 10:12
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The channel makes it so easy to set back, you can really just tinker with it until you're happy with the feel. It seems like a non-answer but no two board set-ups are the same because different people like different feels. For me, I move both feet back about 2 inches in heavy powder when I know I'm going to hit pow. If I'm doing mixed riding, I keep my front foot in the normal spot and only the back foot back 1 inch. Channel is so nice to play around till you're happy though...feel free to fiddle.

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