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In the NHL, when tracking the relevant statistics (ice time, number of shifts, time per shift, etc) for player a on team A, while team A is playing team B, does a shift officially end in the following situations? I cannot find any official rules for this, so if possible please point me to the correct reference!

In each of the following situations, does it count as a new shift or a continuation of the previous shift?

  1. Player a is on the ice, a stoppage of play occurs causing the clock to be stopped, and player a chooses to remain on the ice for the ensuing faceoff.
  2. Player a is on the ice, either team scores, and player a chooses to remain on the ice for the ensuing faceoff.
  3. Player a is on the ice, either team commits a penalty causing a stoppage of play, and player a chooses to remain on the ice for the ensuing faceoff.
  4. Player a is on the ice, player a commits a penalty and goes to the penalty box, and then player a comes back on the ice after serving the penalty time.
  5. Player a is on the ice, player a commits a penalty and goes to the penalty box, and then player a comes back on the ice, before serving all of the penalty time because team B scores, for the ensuing faceoff.
  6. Player a is on the ice, the period ends, and player a starts on the ice for the next period.
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Being more Advanced stats rather than rules shift lengths vary and can be subject to interpretation. Typically a shift would be time on ice during the normal course of play through the game which are often less than a minute in the NHL. Your situations are interesting though.

For 1-3: Typically the coaches get to decide who stays on ice after a stoppage in play. If the players remain on ice after a stoppage then that is considered part of their shift, not a new shift.

For 4 & 5: This is where I am unsure due to the fact that the player is not on ice but rather in the box and whether they stay afterwards or not is the time in the penalty box considered a shift?

For 6: Starting a new period would be considered a new shift.

I believe other advanced stats may be more useful such as time on ice but the NHL rulebook doesn't provide any context for game statistics.

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