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Why are the players in snooker now using separate rests? They are both touching the wood all around the sides of the table, where they rest their hand to play a shot, so what difference does touching the same wooden rest make?

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  • Hi! Welcome to the site. It sounds like you're asking about a particular accommodation being made for the current COVID-19 situation. Is that correct? If so, are you asking about a particular league (such as the World Snooker Tour) you've seen on TV, or are you asking about your local Snooker hall?
    – Joe
    Jun 11 '20 at 18:59
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I imagine the justification is based on practicality. It would be virtual impossible to have players avoid touching the table and/or to sanitise the table after each shot.

The issue is that having separate rests for players to use is a low-cost and low-effort solution to reducing risk in an environment that is already fairly safe, at least in relation to grocery stores, schools and work places.

With the Championship League all players, referees, commentators and staff are required to take tests for COVID-19.

There will be social distancing measures throughout the venue and players seated at least two metres apart during matches, which is not a problem for snooker.

Players must use anti-bacterial hand sanitiser before matches and avoid handshakes, while first aid personnel will be on site at all times.

While the tests are being analysed, players will be required to wait in isolation in a private area and unable to move until given the all-clear.

If a player wins a match and leaves the building, he will be tested again on his return before being allowed to re-enter the venue, though no guests will be allowed to attend.

A catering service will be provided at the hotel, though no-one is allowed to share food or have dinner together.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/snooker/52848049


They are both touching the wood all around the sides of the table, where they rest their hand to play a shot, so what difference does touching the same wooden rest make?

In reality most players would avoid making any poor positional shots that require them to place their bridge hand on the rail. In some cases this isn't possible, especially if the opponent leaves the ball in an undesirable position. The area where players will be resting their bridge hand (either on the cloth or rails) is a much larger surface area than the handle of a rest.

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