1

In one incident :

Pakistan captain Babar was found guilty of 'illegal fielding' after he handled a ball using wicket-keeping gloves

It seems that the wicket-keep intentionally dropped his gloves to better hold the ball and throw it towards the stumps. The fielder, just having mindless fun, decided to wear the gloves.

There are more incidents like that, but restricting to only this Incident.

According to MCC :

28.2 Fielding the ball
28.2.1 A fielder may field the ball with ....
.... have fielded the ball illegally if
28.2.1.1 uses anything other than part of his/her person to field the ball.
28.2.1.3 discards a piece of clothing, equipment or any other object which subsequently makes contact with the ball.

By 28.2.1.1, Babar (who used some equipment) is at fault for "fielding illegally".
By 28.2.1.3, the wicket-keeper (who discarded the equipment, which made contact with the ball) is at fault for "fielding illegally".

Of course, Babar is already at fault for wearing the gloves, but is he also at fault for "fielding illegally" ?
Or is it the wicket-keeper who is at fault for "fielding illegally" ?

It is curiosity to know this, but it may have implications on who pays the fine and whose record shows the fault for "fielding illegally".

1 Answer 1

2

The wicket-keeper did nothing wrong; it is perfectly acceptable (and relatively common) for the wicket-keeper to discard their gloves if they field a ball away from the wicket and wish to throw the ball, normally to run to run a batter out.

I see that a literal reading of the Laws means that the wicket-keeper is responsible here, but the reasoning behind 28.2.1.3 is to prevent a player doing something like throwing their hat at the ball in order to stop it.

5
  • +1 , Yes , I agree : Wicket-keeper is morally in the clear, but even Babar did not get undue advantage from the gloves. Holding Babar responsible means even Wicket-keeper is responsible. Alternatively, a "Warning" would suffice. Enforcing the laws against Babar means it should be enforced against Wicket-keeper too. Imagine this Scenario when we say Wicket-keeper did nothing wrong : Wicket-keeper drops gloves, runs towards ball, throws ball at wickets, but hits the gloves !
    – Prem
    Jul 3 at 17:09
  • Or, this Scenario : Wicket-keep runs towards ball which is between the wickets and drops gloves, returning batsman runs over gloves and falls : It is "Obstruction" and Wicket-keeper is responsible. Even though I have seen Wicket-keepers dropping gloves, there is a risk attached.
    – Prem
    Jul 3 at 17:19
  • You've been around here long enough to know that comments are not for asking additional questions.
    – Philip Kendall
    Jul 3 at 17:22
  • It is not additional Q, I am only justifying (with 2 other Examples) why I think Wicket-keeper is Partially at fault, for starting the events which lead to Current Situation.
    – Prem
    Jul 3 at 17:29
  • 2
    @Prem In the case in the question the law is clear. The deliberate action that caused the illegal fielding is that of Babar, the law is clear only the keep may use glove. The ball would have to have struck the discarded glove without other action for it to be wicket keeper. Additionally as umpires you would report the incident. Saying something like the wicket keeper drop his glove which was picked up by Babar who then fielded the ball whilst wearing glove. Match referee decides who if anyone would get fine or charged. A report doesn't automatically result in disciplinary action.
    – Ben Whyall
    Jul 21 at 20:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.