How is extra time decided to be given in football, either when the teams have scored the same number of goals, or when one team has scored more goals?

Can teams have extra time by requesting it, in either of the above cases?

Can they request extra time if extra time has already been given?

  • are you talking about stoppage time or over time? – wax eagle Jul 18 '13 at 12:47
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    @waxeagle, extra time – Azik Abdullah Jul 18 '13 at 12:50
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You have 2 kinds of "extra time"

The first is a couple of minutes added to a half time because the match was delayed for various reasons. (injuries, subs, fouls, etc...). This one is called Stoppage time.

The second is 2 additional half times of 15 minutes each (30 min total). This extra time is only given when the match is a knockout phase and there is no winner yet. If there is still no winner after the extra time, the game proceeds in penalties.

So, to answer the question: Extra time can only be given by the referee at the end of a knockout phase when there is no winner (score is equal). Teams can not ask for extra time.

Ref: wikipedia

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    Perhaps you can add a reference? – Jacob Jan Tuinstra Jul 18 '13 at 12:31
  • The first example is more commonly referred to as "additional/injury/stoppage time". The second example is what most people know extra time to be (or overtime if you're in US/Canada). – Ticky Aug 1 '13 at 3:03
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    extra time is extra time, stoppage time is stoppage time, there are NOT 2 kinds of extra time. – AnthonyBlake Oct 8 '13 at 6:50
  • In the English League Cup Semi Final 2nd Leg, if the two teams are tied at full time then it proceeds to extra time. If at the end of extra time, the teams are tied but one team leads on the away goals rule then it does not proceed to extra time. – ediblecode Aug 4 '14 at 15:51
  • This being an old Q&A, I don't expect much to change, but extra time is specifically different from additional time. It is also not clear whether additional time always consists of "a couple of minutes" or (the actual practise) is variable to account for exactly the time lost as determined by the referee. – Nij Jun 3 '17 at 5:49

Extra time is played, when at the end of the match for which there must be a winner (ie a knockout, final or cup match), both teams have the same number of goals1.

Law 10 - Determining the Outcome of a Match, Section 2 - Winning Team:

When competition rules require a winning team after a drawn match or home-and-away tie, the only permitted procedures to determine the winning team are:

  • away goals rule
  • two equal periods of extra time not exceeding 15 minutes each
  • kicks from the penalty mark

A combination of the above procedures may be used.

Teams have no say in whether extra time is played and cannot request more. The full time allotted (usually two equal periods of 15 minutes) must be played, and if the scores are level after this time, kicks from the penalty mark must be used to determine the winner.

If the competition rules do not allow kicks from the penalty mark to be used, the match is drawn and the teams must be separated (for the purposes of qualification, or deciding the winner of the final or cup being contested) by some other procedure - such as a replay, a coin toss, or some other method as determined by the competition rules or competiton administrator.

Extra time is commonly confused with the allowance for time lost (or, as it also known, additional time) played at the end of each period to compensate for significant delays to restarts during the period. The term extra time should only be used to refer to the procedure used to determine the winner at the end of a drawn match.

1 - in some competitions, the away goals rule is used - in these competitions, extra time is only played if the teams cannot be separated based on both the aggregate score over both of the home-and-away matches and the number of away goals scored.

Extra time is added if the game is tied at the end of the regular time in certain knockout competitions, the game goes into two extra periods of 15 minutes each (30 minutes total), if the score is still tied by the end of the extra time, the game proceeds into kicks from the penalty mark (as named in the laws of the game) to decide the winner, and extra time is added according to competition regulations.

Also, you shouldn't mix between "extra time" and "stoppage time", as stoppage time (or injury time) are a few minutes added at the end of each half at the discretion of the referee due to injuries, time lost through substitutions, general time wasting etc.

Source

  • Although you distinguish the difference between added time and extra time, you didn't answer who decides this. – alamoot Jun 8 '17 at 8:02
  • This response has exactly the same problems with the answer from years ago, but without any of the actual referencing there. -1 and please read the entire page before you answer, next time. – Nij Jun 8 '17 at 8:30
  • I have fixed up the answer a bit, hopefully it's better, sorry :( – TheRedstoner17 Jun 8 '17 at 18:06
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    The game does not proceed to penalty kicks, the correct and only term is KFTPM. The referee does not add extra time, this is decided by competition regulations. Linking to a Wikibook instead of the actual laws is not the best choice. Fixes helped but there are still issues. – Nij Jun 8 '17 at 18:11
  • @Nij is this better? – TheRedstoner17 Jun 8 '17 at 19:11

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