5

I just heard that for example knees to the head are not allowed to a grounded opponent in MMA.

Does it mean he is lying on the ground or does he has to be on the ground with both legs and both hands?

2

A fighter is grounded anytime they have more than just the soles of their feet on the ground. If they have so much as a finger or a shin on the ground, they are grounded. Also, if they are leaning on the cage fence, and would be on the ground if it weren't for the cage holding them up, they are also considered grounded.

From the Association of Boxing Commissions Unified Rules of MMA, Fouls section:

16.Kicking the head of a grounded opponent.

A grounded opponent is any fighter who has more than just the soles of their feet on the ground. (i.e. could have one shin or one finger down to be considered a downed fighter) If the referee determines that a fighter would be a grounded fighter but is not solely because the ring ropes or cage fence has held fighter from the ground, the referee can instruct the combatants that he is treating the fighter held up solely by the cage or ropes as a grounded fighter

17.Kneeing the Head of a grounded opponent

A grounded opponent is any fighter who has more than just the soles of their feet on the ground. If the referee determines that a fighter would be a grounded fighter but is not solely because the ring ropes or cage fence has held fighter from the ground, the referee can instruct the combatants that he is treating the fighter held up solely by the cage or ropes as a grounded fighter.

18.Stomping of a grounded fighter

Stomping is considered any type of striking action with the feet where the fighter lifts their leg up bending their leg at the knee and initiating a striking action with the bottom of their foot or heel . (Note) Axe kicks are not stomps. Standing foot stops are NOT a foul. As such, this foul does not include stomping the feet of a standing fighter.

This rule has seen some abuse, as fighters would often put a hand to the ground as a strike was coming in an attempt to draw a foul.

The 2013 ABC Convention addressed this, and issued a "Touching Down" rule statement that suggested a change be made to the rules to allow the referee to consider a fighter still standing in this case, and/or penalize them for timidity.

Referees should instruct the fighters that they may still be considered a standing fighter even if they have a finger or portion of the hand (or entire hand) on the canvas. In the discretion of the referee, a fighter who has a finger or hand on the canvas may still be legally struck in the head with knees and kicks. The referee may decide that the downed fighter is placing his or her finger or hand down without doing so for an offensive or countering maneuver in an attempt to advance or improve their position. The referee may decide that the downed fighter is instead simply trying to draw a foul. If the referee decides that the fighter is "touching down" simply to benefit from a foul, the referee may consider that fighter a standing fighter and decide that no foul has occurred.

Additionally, a referee may penalize, via warning or point deduction, the offending fighter for timidity.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.