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I have a few related questions about traveling in basketball. I get the general idea, but I am not sure about some specific cases. They all involve the pivot foot leaving the ground. The first three cases are:

  1. You catch the ball standing on one leg. Then you jump off that leg and land on both feet at the same time. (I understand this is not a travel, but I am asking to make sure).
  2. You catch the ball standing on one leg. Then you jump off that leg and land on the non-pivot foot (i.e., the other leg).
  3. You catch the ball standing on one leg. Then you jump off that leg and land on the pivot foot (i.e., the same leg).

My next series of questions basically asks if it matters is you touch your non-pivot foot to the ground before doing the jump.

  1. You catch the ball standing on one leg. You touch your other foot to the ground and raise it again. Then you jump off that leg and land on both feet at the same time.
  2. You catch the ball standing on one leg. You touch your other foot to the ground and raise it again. Then you jump off that leg and land on the non-pivot foot (i.e., the other leg).
  3. (This one is definitely a travel) You catch the ball standing on one leg. You touch your other foot to the ground and raise it again. Then you jump off that leg and land on the pivot foot (i.e., the same leg).

Which if any of these are travels? Also, does it matter if you were instead to catch the ball in the air and then land on one leg, instead of just catching the ball on one leg.

  • A player who receives the ball while he is progressing or upon completion of a dribble, may take two steps in coming to a stop, passing or shooting the ball. - NBA Regulations – Don Larynx Dec 19 '13 at 19:01
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The answer to all questions regards the "jump stop". Here is a summary of the traveling rule, which includes this concept:

  1. A player who catches the ball with both feet on the floor may pivot, using either foot. When one foot is lifted, the other is the pivot foot.

  2. A player who catches the ball while moving or dribbling may stop and establish a pivot foot as follows:

    a. If both feet are off the floor and the player lands;
    (1) Simultaneously on both feet, either foot may be the pivot.
    (2) On one foot followed by the other, the first foot to touch is the pivot.
    (3) On one foot, the player may jump off that foot and simultaneously land on both. Neither foot can be a pivot in this case.

    b. If one foot is on the floor;
    (1) It is the pivot when the other foot touches in a step.
    (2) The player may jump off that foot and simultaneously land on both. Neither foot can be a pivot in this case.

  3. After coming to a stop and establishing a pivot foot:

    a. The pivot foot may be lifted, but not returned to the floor, before the ball is released on a pass or try for goal;
    b. If the player jumps, neither foot may be returned to the floor before > the ball is released on a pass or try for goal;
    c. The pivot foot may not be lifted, before the ball is released, to start a dribble.

  4. After coming to a stop when neither foot can be a pivot:

    a. One or both feet may be lifted, but may not be returned to the floor, before the ball is released on a pass or try for goal;
    b. Neither foot may be lifted, before the ball is released, to start a dribble.

So regarding your questions:

Question #1: Sounds like 2.b.2 - If one foot is on the floor: The player may jump off that foot and simultaneously land on both. Neither foot can be a pivot in this case.

Question #2 and Question #3 are covered by Section 3.b: After coming to a stop and establishing a pivot foot: If the player jumps, neither foot may be returned to the floor before the ball is released on a pass or try for goal;

So #1 is not a travel as long as you do not move either foot after landing. #2 or #3 would both be a travel as soon as either foot touches the ground.

For the second batch of questions...

Question #1 sounds like 2.b.1 once your other foot touches the ground, which then becomes 3.b and therefore a travel.

Question #2 and Question #3 are also 2.b.1 to start and then become 3.b (jumping once you have a pivot foot) and thus are also a travel.

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So to answer your specific scenarios: A

  1. That is not a travel, but neither foot can be the pivot foot, therefore you may not move either foot from the court before passing or shooting.

  2. This counts as a travel because you switched feet.

  3. This is also a travel, because both feet did not touch after the jump.

B

  1. This does not count as a travel

  2. I'm not sure on this one, could not find any specific references.

  3. Definitely a travel, as you said

C

The first foot to touch automatically becomes the pivot foot, regardless of when the other one touches. Hope this covers everything!

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