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Throughout the World Cup the Google Doodle has been FIFA themed, and clicking it takes you to a search for the latest game. Today it's United States vs Portugal.

The search brings up a chart which appears to be a summary of the game. It looks like it should be obvious what everything means but I can't make heads or tails of it.

Is this a standard football (soccer) game chart?

If so, how is it meant to be read?

Is there a key available?

Full chart reproduced below in case Google results change.

Imgur

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The timeline shows the major events in the match.

I will try to explain by using few events as shown in your example timeline. The number in bracket always indicates the respective player’s jersey number.

  • 5' Nani (#17) 0 – 1 Portugal: a goal was scored by Nani for Portugal.
  • 16' Portugal made a subtitution, in which Hélder Postiga (#23) was replaced by Éder (#11).
  • 46' Portugal made a subtitution, in which André Almeida (#19) was replaced by William (#6).
  • 64' Jermaine Jones (#13) United States 1 – 1: a goal was scored by Jermaine Jones for USA.
  • 75' Jermaine Jones (#13) gets a yellow card (see the color of the card shown)
  • 90+1' First minute of stoppage time, USA makes a substitution.
  • 90+5' Fifth minute of stoppage time --> a second goal was scored by Silvestre Varela (#18) for Portugal.

There is additional time allotted after the standard 90 minutes are over. Please refer to this question.

The rest of the timeline can be read using the above examples.

I believe this is a pretty standard timeline chart for a football match.

  • That helps but there are still questions. In the timeline, what does "90 + 1'" mean? What is the boxed event with Jermaine Jones at 75'? And is this a standard way to chart a soccer game or is it something Google just made up? – Robert Jun 23 '14 at 19:31
  • @Robert the boxed events are just because of the videos. – Phab Jun 30 '14 at 8:41

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