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Suppose a batsman clobbers a ball out of the park and while the ball is in the air inside the boundary, he falls onto his wicket and is out. Shortly after the ball crosses over and falls outside the boundary.

Is this out because the batsman is hit wicket? Or is the ball deemed to be out of play as soon as the batsman hit it? I guess the question hinges on when a ball becomes out of play - on leaving the bat or on falling somewhere.

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He can only be out hit wicket "in commission of a stroke, or when setting off for his first run" - so if he spins around, loses balance and falls on his stumps, he'll be out, regardless of where the ball is going. However, if he hits it, then steps away from the stumps, then back again and stands on his stumps, he's not out.

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LAW 35 (HIT WICKET) -

(a) The striker is out Hit wicket if, after the bowler has entered his delivery stride and while the ball is in play, his wicket is put down either by the striker’s bat or by his person as described in Law 28.1(a)(ii), (iii) and (iv) (Wicket put down).

either (i) in the course of any action taken by him in preparing to receive or in receiving a delivery, or (ii) in setting off for his first run immediately after playing or playing at the ball,

or (iii) if he makes no attempt to play the ball, in setting off for his first run, providing that in the opinion of the umpire this is immediately after he has had the opportunity of playing the ball,

or (iv) in lawfully making a second or further stroke for the purpose of guarding his wicket within the provisions of Law 34.3 (Ball lawfully struck more than once).

(b) If the striker puts his wicket down in any of the ways described in Law 28.1(a)(ii), (iii) and (iv) (Wicket put down) before the bowler has entered his delivery stride, either umpire shall call and signal Dead ball. More Details

Suppose a batsman clobbers a ball out of the park and while the ball is in the air inside the boundary, he falls onto his wicket and is out. Shortly after the ball crosses over and falls outside the boundary.

In this case the ball will be dead as the ball has passed the boundary rows so the batsmen could not be declared OUT.

LAW 23 (DEAD BALL)-

(a) The ball becomes dead when

(i) it is finally settled in the hands of the wicket-keeper or of the bowler.

(ii) a boundary is scored. See Law 19.3 (Scoring a boundary). More Details

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