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I've been hearing a lot of words thrown around by climbers like "crimper", "gaston", "flag out", "whipper", "flapper", and others.

What do these and the rest even mean? Could someone compile a list of these definitions?

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This is a work in progress:

Beta

  • n. Instructions, suggestions, methods for doing a move (or sequence of moves) in a route. ("You're doing that the hard way. Try my beta...")

Bump

  • n. A movement where the hand (or foot) that moved last, makes the next move as well. For example, you grab a hold with your right hand, then move again with the same hand to a further hold.
  • v. To do the movement described above.

Choss

  • n. Any kind of debris found on outdoor rock, including chalk buildup, moss, dirt, vines, vegetation, etc.
  • Variation: chossy (adj.) being covered in choss ("Bring a brush; that route is chossy!")

Crimp

  • n. Type of hold (or hand position) where the fingers are curled and the fingertips are used most prominently to pull.
  • v. To use the hand position described above (not necessarily on a "crimp" hold). There is an open-handed crimp position where the thumb is not used, as well as a closed-handed "full-crimp" position where the thumb is used. Both variations have their uses.

Cross

  • n. A movement where the hand (or foot) horizontally passes the other hand (or foot). The term is often used in contrast with a "bump", to clarify how to approach the next hold. ("Should I cross with my left hand, or bump with my right?")
  • v. To do the movement described above.

Deadpoint

  • n. The apex of the body trajectory in a dynamic movement.

Dyno

  • n. A dynamic movement where the climber launches up to a hold (or holds) with both feet leaving the wall before the hands reach their destination. Essentially a jump.

Edge

  • n. Type of hold where the usable side consists of a flat, often 90-degree angle. Similar to a crimp, but usually deeper (at least to the first knuckle) and more flat.

First Ascent

  • n. The first ever successful send (by anybody) for a given route. Sometimes abbreviated to "F.A."

Flag

  • n. To extend one's leg and foot outward (at least somewhat horizontally) against and along the wall, rigidly, as a technique to avoid body swing (barn-door). The name comes from horizontal flagpoles.

Flapper

  • n. A skin injury (generally on the fingers or hand) where a portion of torn skin is left partially attached, like a flap.

Flash

  • n. A successful send on one's first attempt. (Beta may or may not have been given, and the climber may or may not have seen someone else doing the same climb prior to the ascent.)
  • v. To successfully send a route on one's first attempt, as described above.

Gaston

  • n. A hand position where the hand is pointed inward while the elbow points outward. This is generally the reverse of a side-pull, in which the hand points outward.
  • v. To use the hand position described above.

Jib

  • n. Type of hold that is very small, often approximately coin-sized, generally used as footing (though in some situations used as hand-holds as well).

Jug

  • n. Type of hold that is large and deep enough to wrap one's fingers behind easily. The easiest class of hold to use, perhaps with the exception of some "handlebar"-style artificial holds used in gyms.
  • v. To use easy, jug-style holds to climb. ("I'm just going to jug up to the top since we're in a hurry.")

On-sight

  • n. A successful send on one's first attempt (a "flash") without having been given any beta and without having seen another climber work on the route beforehand.
  • v. To successfully send a route on one's first attempt, as described above.

Pinch

  • n. Type of hold (or hand position) where two opposite sides are used in a compressing fashion: one side for the thumb, and the other side for the remaining fingers.
  • v. To use the hand technique described above.

Pump

  • n. An effect caused by overuse of the forearms where they become stiff and weak
  • Variation: pumpy (adj.) especially taxing on the forearms
  • Variation: pumped (adj.) having forearms that are fatigued from overuse

Red-point

  • n. A climber's first successful send on a particular route, generally after having attempted previously without success. ("I finally got the red-point on that 5.11 today!")
  • v. To send a route as described above.

Send

  • n. A successful completion of a route without falling or resting on the rope.
  • v. To successfully complete a route without falling or resting on the rope.
  • Variations: sent (v., past tense)

Sloper (rhymes with "hope her")

  • n. Type of hold where the hand is mostly open and flat, and where the climber must rely more heavily on managing static friction instead of gripping.
  • Variation: slopey (adj.) having many slopers ("That route sure is slopey!")

Whipper

  • n. A particularly long-distance, often undesirable fall while sport climbing or trad climbing. The name comes from the whipping motion of the rope while catching the fall.

I know there are more, but I'll have to add them later.

Comment on or edit this answer if you think anything should be added or changed.

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