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Questions about the sport of baseball in general. For the American professional baseball league, see [mlb]. Note that autograph identification questions ("Who signed this baseball?") are OFF-TOPIC and will be closed.

1
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Yes, the home team certainly can win by more than one run. For an example, see Royals vs Tigers on 2019-05-05: the score was tied at 2 after nine innings, the Royals didn't score in the top of the te …
answered May 23 by Philip Kendall
3
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Yes, this is called a stolen base or a "steal" and is a relatively common occurrence in the game.
answered Jul 7 '15 by Philip Kendall
9
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Thrown baseballs move a lot faster than people. The ball will get to second and then back to home again before the runner from third can make it home, particularly as the runner on third has to delay …
answered Apr 22 '17 by Philip Kendall
4
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Yes. He was the pitcher of record at the time that the other team took the lead and never relinquished it, so he gets the loss. While this may seem unlikely, most things have happened in baseball at …
answered May 6 '18 by Philip Kendall
3
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This is covered by Rule 9.05(b)(1): The official scorer shall not credit a base hit when a runner is forced out by a batted ball. Also note that this third base runner scored a run is inco …
answered Jul 1 '16 by Philip Kendall
0
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The slugging "percentage" is "the mean number of bases a batter obtains per at bat". As such, multiplying two slugging percentages together doesn't have an intuitive "physical" meaning - it's a quanti …
answered Oct 12 '16 by Philip Kendall
2
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The runner on first is safe. As soon as the fielder stepped on first base, the force was removed, so the runner was perfectly entitled to stay at first base. While you say this was "poor baserunning" …
answered Aug 16 '18 by Philip Kendall
2
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Why does the umpire and manager/player keep on argueing after the ejection? Why does anyone ever argue with a umpire/referee at all? Certainly no official at the professional level is ever going …
answered Sep 13 '17 by Philip Kendall
5
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The runner must be tagged out. To quote from the MLB rules, Rule 5.09(b)(6): if a following runner is put out on a force play, the force is removed and the runner must be tagged to be put out. …
answered May 22 '16 by Philip Kendall
6
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Your recollection is wrong, at least under MLB rules. Quoting from the Official MLB rules, page 144: A FOUL BALL is a batted ball that [...] while on or over foul territory, touches the person o …
answered Jun 8 '16 by Philip Kendall
4
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order to do so. As mhodges has commented, what analytics has brought to baseball is a better understanding of how to rate those utility players - previously, it was perfectly feasible for a player …
answered Feb 10 '17 by Philip Kendall
1
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I think you just have the definition of slugging percentage wrong. Quoting from Wikipedia: [Slugging percentage] is calculated as total bases divided by at bats SLG = ((1B) + (2 x 2B) + (3 x …
answered May 28 '16 by Philip Kendall
5
votes
Without wanting to bowdlerise it too much... it starts with "mother" and the next letter is an "f".
answered Oct 30 '17 by Philip Kendall
5
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This Yahoo! Sports page contains the quote Three errors charged on one play, which by all accounts ties a major league record. The Wikipedia page List of Major League Baseball single-game …
answered Jun 14 '15 by Philip Kendall
7
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, but they didn't lose any. 1869 obviously isn't the live ball era, but it is the year that MLB recognise as the start of professional baseball. …
answered Jun 13 '16 by Philip Kendall

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