17

Most Major League starting pitchers have between three and four different kinds of pitches that they can throw throughout the game. Examples are Fastabll Changeup Slider Curveball Cut Fastball Kunckleball The break and speed of these pitches vary quite dramatically so it's important for the catcher to know what's coming. The reason that a pitcher has so ...


13

The run does not count. According to MLB rules: 4.09 HOW A TEAM SCORES. (a) One run shall be scored each time a runner legally advances to and touches first, second, third and home base before three men are put out to end the inning. EXCEPTION: A run is not scored if the runner advances to home base during a play in which the third out is made (1) by the ...


12

There are two ways to deliver a pitch from the mound: The windup The stretch Most pitchers will pitch out of the windup when there are no runners on base. It usually helps with the pitchers rhythm. They are able to use a high leg kick and deliver a pitch. Some relievers will pitch out of the stretch whether or not there is a runner on base. This is ...


12

According to UmpiresMedia.com, getting a “head start” is considered illegal in professional baseball. Actually, it is listed in the rules you linked Rule 5.09(c)(1) Comment (Rule 7.10(a) Comment): “Retouch,” in this rule, means to tag up and start from a contact with the base after the ball is caught. A runner is not permitted to take a flying start ...


11

This has happened before, most notably the Grand Slam Single of the 1999 NLCS. The Braves and Mets were tied 3-3 in the bottom of the ninth. The Mets loaded the bases, and Robin Ventura crushed a grand slam. He was mobbed at first base, and never touched second. Only Cedeno, the runner on third, actually touched home. Ventura was awarded a single, and the ...


11

Both are. The left logo is the official team logo since 1968. The right one with the letters NY is the more famous one, because it's way older and they still use it on the caps and jerseys. This iconic logo has been introduced in 1915 and was the official brand logo until 1946 and has been used on the team wear ever since. In 1947 the Yankees introduced ...


10

Video - Matt Holiday did this in an extra inning game against the Brewers in 2014 with the game tied 3-3 and a runner on 3rd.


10

A few that come to mind: The "neighborhood play" at second base, where the fielder doesn't actually touch second base during a double play attempt. Batters going to first base if a pitch that they made no effort to get out of the way of hits them. According to the rules, a batter must attempt to get out of the way of a pitch. An outfielder using the wall ...


10

This is banned explicitly in the 2008 rules (only ones I could find, and may have been replaced since the new CBA was issued, but I'm going to go out on a limb that this particular section's language has not changed). (i) PLAYER LOANS. (1) Prohibited at Major League Level. All right or claim of a Major League Club to a player, unless it is under ...


10

Five pitchers have done it. This ESPN article from April 14, 2012 lists the following three occurrences: 10 -- Tom Seaver, N.Y. Mets vs. San Diego, April 22, 1970 9 -- Ricky Nolasco, Florida at Atlanta, Sept. 30, 2009 9 -- Aaron Harang, L.A. Dodgers vs. San Diego, April 13, 2012 Then on September 27, 2012, Doug Fister of the Detroit Tigers struck out 9 ...


10

The man on 2nd is only out if: The 3rd baseman tags third, which would make him out by force-out or The 3rd baseman tags the player. If the man on 2nd decides to not run to third, then he would only be out by one of those two options. It's only a force if you tag the base the runner is required to go to by rule. 3B's claim is incorrect; the runner on ...


10

The Baseball-Reference.com Batting Game Finder has data going back to 1903. To get the list of pitchers who have hit home runs in the postseason, make the following setting changes on that page: select "Find Players with Most Matching Games in Multiple Years" select "Postseason" for "Batter's Defensive Position", make sure ...


10

I think you're confusing "run" and "home run". In high-level terms: A run is scored when a player starts off as a batter then makes it all the way back round to home plate without being put out, no matter if he stops at any bases along the way. A home run happens when a batter hits the ball over the fences (or equivalent). When this happens, any players ...


10

This isn't perfectly answerable, because it's easy to come up with specific things that only occur once if you get complicated enough. However, if you limit it to things that would merit a sports news organization writing an article about it, then probably the most rare occurrence is a team scoring in every inning for a full nine inning game (meaning, ...


9

The pitcher has the final decision, since he is the one throwing the pitch. Before every game, the pitcher, catcher and pitching coach meet to discuss pitching strategies. They already have an approach before the batter steps into the batter's box. The catcher then signals the pitcher (sometimes, the coach will signal the catcher first). This is primarily ...


9

This is governed by Rule 7.10 [The runner is out on appeal when] With the ball in play, while advancing or returning to a base, he fails to touch each base in order before he, or a missed base, is tagged. So if you miss a bag on your home run trot, you not only have to hit that bag, but you need to go back to each one and re round the bases. IIRC it is ...


9

This was actually a fairly tough on to dig up. As you mention in your question, the East and West swapped back and forth, and until 1985 the AL and NL were in sync. However something happened in 1985. Change came to the playoffs. The LCS were changed from 5 games to 7 and in addition the commissioner decided that the AL and NL would go to opposite divisions ...


9

If a runner scores before the third out is made on a play such as you describe, the run counts. The runner on first stealing second is not considered a force play, therefore, the run counts. Rule 5.08(a) states: One run shall be scored each time a runner legally advances to and touches first, second, third and home base before three men are put out ...


9

According to Wikipedia, the 7th Inning Stretch is something that is widely disputed, and no real record exists of exactly when it started. There are several accounts of what could have started it, but no real proof that any of them are the real reason it was started. Can't really comment on why it's in the 7th inning and not earlier in the game. The ...


9

Thrown baseballs move a lot faster than people. The ball will get to second and then back to home again before the runner from third can make it home, particularly as the runner on third has to delay starting until the catcher has thrown the ball to second at all.


9

There are a couple reasons, but the primary one is thinking about the location of the runners by the time the ball is picked up. There are a few things you're correct about: There is a force out at third. Throwing to a closer base is generally safer. Getting an out at third would probably have prevented at least one run from scoring. But, it's important ...


8

not only is it legal, it's been done! Here's the proof, from 1989, by the San Francisco Giants' Kevin Mitchell: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7b_NY5iA3hw


8

Apart from batting out of order, the answer is no. The whole purpose of batting is to hit the ball to obtain the right to run the bases. So a batter can't get on base without hitting the ball first (unless he walks). Counting home plate (where you bat), there are potentially four base runners. Three outs ends the inning, so there can be at most two outs, ...


8

NO. Rule 6.10(b) 2 It is not mandatory that a club designate a hitter for the pitcher, but failure to do so prior to the game precludes the use of a Designated Hitter for that club for that game. 10 Once the game pitcher bats for the Designated Hitter, such move shall terminate the Designated Hitter role for that club for the remainder of the ...


8

This is basically one of the million dollar questions in sports today: Why are pitchers getting hurt more now than ever before? Nobody knows the answer, but here are a couple theories: Athletes are bigger and stronger than ever today. They lift more weights, maintain better nutrition, and have access to technology and knowledge that has never ...


8

At the very least there is this comment on rule 3.01(e) of the official MLB rules that seems to indicate that the runner must cross home plate after hitting a home run, before play can resume. Rule 3.01(e) Comment: The umpire shall not give an alternate ball to the pitcher until play has ended and the previously used ball is dead. After a thrown or batted ...


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