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7

The simple answer is that there are very few chances for such a feat. Pitchers are usually replaced when they're being ineffective, not when they're doing a good job. I'd say you'd generally need have to have one of: Using an "opener" Injury to starting pitcher Hard pitch count limit to create such an opportunity. Otherwise the manager is going to tend ...


6

According to the 14U rules here: The Official Baseball Rules are the first in the order of precedence to specify a rule for this scenario. According to The Official Baseball Rules Rule 5.09(b)3) - A runner is out when ... He intentionally interferes with a thrown ball; or hinders a fielder attempting to make a play on a batted ball The runner should ...


4

The definition for "Fair Ball" in the MLB rules say: If a fly ball lands in the infield between home and first base, or home and third base, and then bounces to foul territory without touching a player or umpire and before passing first or third base, it is a foul ball; or if the ball settles on foul territory or is touched by a player on foul ...


4

Rule 5.05(2)b If a batter is struck with a pitch while it is in the strike zone, it should be a strike. Otherwise, it is a ball or a HBP, depending on if the batter tried to get out the way.


4

Baseball has a lot of "unwritten rules". One of these is that a pitcher who is in the midst of a possible no hitter is kept in the game until he completes the no hitter or gives up a hit. This is probably because throwing a no hitter of any sort is a rare feat, and a starting pitcher who is taken out of such a game may be upset if he is taken out and denied ...


4

This is covered by MLB rule 5.09(b)(6) From 5.09(b) 5.09(b) Any runner is out when: [...] (6) He or the next base is tagged before he touches the next base, after he has been forced to advance by reason of the batter becoming a runner. However, if a following runner is put out on a force play, the force is removed and the runner must ...


4

Kad's answer is correct -- any ball that has not touched the ground and is caught, regardless of the runner's position, is out by flyout. However, I wanted to challenge the premise of the question. This is an impossible scenario This could never happen in any baseball game due to the physics of a flyball. For example, this question has an answer for one ...


4

Runners are not allowed to advance before the defense catches a ball directly off the bat (so ground balls do not count in this situation). After it is caught, or if the ball is not caught directly off the bat, then the runner may leave the base. If the runner does leave early, then the defense may put the runner out by tagging the base before the runner ...


3

The runner would not be out unless tagged while not on a base. A force at third only exists if there are two runners behind him. Since there is an open base at first, there is no force.


3

Yes. It doesn't matter how the ball gets to the base, if a player touches the base with control of the ball before the runner gets there, the runner is out. The pitcher could throw, kick, or roll the ball to first if they wanted to. On rare occasions, the ball will get stuck in their glove so a pitcher will throw their entire glove (with the ball inside) ...


3

I am look[ing] for win and loss stats on [the] MLB website. As already noted, click the "Standings" tab. This contains win and loss statistics for every team for every date during a given season. You can also toggle between the wild card race, spring training standings, postseason projections (later in the season), division/league/MLB and standard/advanced....


3

Since it's really hard for the runner at second to be in foul territory, this is covered by MLB Rules 5.09(b)(7) 5.09(b) Any runner is out when [...] (7) He is touched by a fair ball in fair territory before the ball has gone through, or by, an infielder and no other in - fielder has a chance to make a play on the ball. The ball is ...


3

It depends. The definition of an earned run is one that would have occurred "without the benefit of an error or a passed ball." The official scorer attempts to reconstruct the inning as it would have played out without errors and passed balls, and only the runs that score in that scenario count as earned. The scoring runner in your scenario may or may not ...


3

ERA stands for Earned Run Average and to put it in other words, the average number of runs given up per game. Earned runs divided by innings pitched gives you the average number of runs per inning, which isn't particularly meaningful or easily understood. Multiple by 9, though, and now it becomes easy to grasp. For example, at the start of the season ...


3

I'm going to assume you're asking about MLB rules. There, a fair ball is defined as: A FAIR BALL is a batted ball that settles on fair ground between home and first base, or between home and third base, or that is on or over fair territory when bounding to the outfield past first or third base, or that touches first, second or third base, or that ...


3

You were correct. The specific rule depends on the exact rulebook your league uses, which you did not state. I’ll show the rules from the (international) WSBC Slow Pitch Softball Playing Rules (2018–2021): 5.10.3 a) A runner is out and the ball remains live when: […] vi. they physically pass a preceding runner before that runner has ...


2

Joey Gallo hit a pop up on April 21, 2019 against the Houston Astros that was measured by StatCast to have reached 207 feet at its apex and had a hang time of 7.3 seconds. Off the bat, the shortstop headed to short right field, but the wind brought the ball back to the infield and it dropped at the shortstop position for an infield base hit.


2

There are many factors and reasons that watching a homerun ball is considered bad etiquette. One stems from the difference in the regular behavior vs. the behavior when a homerun is hit. Baseball players are taught from a young age to not watch the ball when they hit it, but to turn and run to first base. Turning your head and watching the play invariably ...


2

Reading the article, there is only one other player who managed to have the same batting average for 3 consecutive years. **Mookie Wilson, with .276 from 1983 to 1985. The Most Consistent Hitter In Baseball History by Michael Salfino and Neil Paine So I don't think there is another player with 4 or 3 years aside from the listed here (Khris Davis & ...


2

It is exactly being at second or third base. The point is that it is (usually) enough to hit a single to score a run by that player, which is not true for players at first base, or home.


2

Manny Machado's follow-through hit the Red Sox catcher once in the series, and Xander Bogaerts did the same to the Dodgers' catcher. In either case, these were incidental contacts and a simple apology was given to the catcher. No punitive ruling was assessed, and none would be. When it becomes an issue is if a baserunner goes to steal a base. If in this ...


2

You need to click on the "standings" tab:


2

This would not be ruled a force out but would be scored as a put out much like if the outfielder had thrown it to third to tag an advancing runner there. I'd assume the batter would be given a single since it was hit to the outfield. If the official scorer viewed there could have reasonably been an out made at first, it would be ruled a fielder's choice.


2

According to Baseball Almanac prior to 1920 this was not possible. In fact, if a runner was on base, the batter would not be given credit for a home run. However, this is now explicitly allowed in the rules. While 7.01(g)(3) states that ... the game ends immediately when the winning run is scored. it also lists the exception for home runs: ...


2

The run scores as this is not a force out. Instead it is a time play - in other words, the third out (at first base in this example) must occur before the runner touches the plate to prevent the score. (The Steve the Ump web site addresses the situation specifically.)


2

Stealing is often not allowed in Little League play. I don't know of a freely available rulebook, but http://www.rutherford-ll.info/rules2.htm has a list of differences between Little League and MLB rules. Position of Runners at Time of Pitch LL - Runner may not leave base before pitch reaches batter. If violation, no runner may advance farther ...


2

This is covered by MLB Rules 5.05(a)(8) 5.05(a) The batter becomes a runner when [...] (8) Any bounding fair ball is deflected by the fielder into the stands, or over or under a fence on fair or foul territory, in which case the batter and all runners shall be entitled to advance two bases; It's a bounding fair ball by hitting the wall. ...


2

I'll put this up as an answer because this question seems like it might not get closed... From the description as being "in the NYC area", it was a quick leap to assume that we're talking about the Yankees here. The time frame(1958) makes them the only likely choice given that the New York Mets did not exist and the New York Giants moved to San Francisco ...


2

When the third baseman touches third to force out the runner coming from second, he removes the force at home. The runner going home must be tagged out and may choose to go back to third because the force has been removed.


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