8

In professional sport, the rule is pretty much "score as many as you can". To take one recent example of this, Ajax beat VVV-Venlo 13-0 in the Erdedivise (top-level Dutch soccer league) on 24th October 2020, including scoring in the 87th minute. In soccer, there is a good strategic reason for this as goal difference is the primary tie-breaker, and ...


6

It is Muggsy Bogues Muggsy Bogues is the shortest player in NBA history, listed at 5'3”. He was drafted 12th overall by the Washington Bullets in 1987 and played later played for the Hornets, Warriors and Raptors. He is only 160cm tall. There is a list of shortest NBA players here.


4

Disney World Orlando, whilst being renowned as every kids' favourite theme park, is also home to the ESPN Wide World of Sport Complex This complex includes sporting facilities such as: The Arena - an indoor complex that can be converted to host 6+ regulation-sized Basketball courts HP Field House - another indoor complex that can host Basketball (is the ...


4

Corner threes are much more efficient than wing or straight-up threes. 82 Games' stats showed corner threes as being about 118.8 points per 100 possessions, while the other two are much lower. (Though, all three are worth doing - Wing 3s are just about the same as an average shot, and straight up (top of the circle) threes are 105.3 points per 100, which is ...


4

For the 2020-21 season the NBA introduced a play-in tournament (somewhat similar to those we saw in 2019-20 post Covid shutdowns). As part of these play-in games, the 7th and 8th seeds of each conference at the end of regular season played each other, where the winner would be ranked the 7th seed for the playoffs. The 9th and 10th ranked teams, would also ...


3

Although it might be rare, this play is actually perfectly legal in both the NCAA and NBA (see the link below). Rule 7 Section 6 Article 6 of the NCAA Rulebook does state that: "The thrower-in shall release the ball not more than five seconds after the throw-in count begins. The pass shall go directly into the playing court, except as provided in Rule 7-...


3

Basketballs are usually made of one of three coatings: Leather: Intended for indoor use only. Synthetic/Hybrid leather: Can be used either indoor or outdoor. Rubber: Can be used either place, but more aimed at outdoor (See this article toward the bottom for some explanation of these.) Dick's also has a good explanation: Leather may have a reputation for ...


2

Note: here I'll refer to the "world" game; there's no one World game style of course, but there are some things that tend to be more common in non-NBA leagues due to some rule differences and court differences. It's a generalization of limited value, but it simplifies the answer. I think that the answer to this would be the difference in the US ...


2

The player you refer to is Mohammad Akkari, who played for Al Mouttahed Tripoli in Lebanon. He scored 113 points, on 32 of 59 shooting from behind the arc, in a game in a Lebanese league in 2012. This was the first FIBA Asia hundred-point game. From wikipedia's list, the top several are children - U14 and U12 leagues mostly; most likely the highest by a ...


2

Offensive fouls for this situation are granted when the offensive player makes a sudden, forceful move. A good defender senses such a move and will usually embellish the action of falling back from from the sudden move. If the movement of the offensive player is only on the order of a simple bump, embellishing the falling movement will be seen as a flop. ...


2

While there's no rule for what makes a basketball an "indoor ball" vs. an "outdoor ball", indoor balls are typically made of full-grain leather while outdoor balls are made of rubber or composite leather. It seems like the Wilson Supreme ball has a rubber sponge coating so I'd say it's designed to withstand outdoor use. You mentioned that ...


2

I believe this is at least mostly answerable from the rulebook, particularly post-Harden rule. Two clarifications that don't actually answer (but make things more clear, I hope, by eliminating some murkiness), then the answer. First: adding the definition of "the gather" into the rulebook made this a bit more clear, I believe, but didn't change ...


2

The NHL has been hosting best of 7 playoff rounds since the 1986-87 season. Looking at Hockey Reference there has been no Stanley Cup champion winning all rounds with the same score. The NBA has been hosting best of 7 playoff rounds 2002-03 season where the San Antonio Spurs on that year became the first and only NBA team to to this date winning all series ...


2

Absolutely. One example is the 2002-03 San Antonio Spurs, who won all four series they played 4 games to 2.


2

There's not a perfect answer to this, particularly given NBA advanced stats are a little rougher than some other sports (MLB, NFL), but we are comparing these two possibilities: Three pointer made: 3 points 2 pointer made, and-one opportunity: 2 points, and one FTA, and one personal foul Fouls in the NBA's PER (Player Efficiency Rating) are rated as such: -...


2

As far as I can tell, not really. They are making some attempt to replicate bits of the home court experience as far as audio/visual cues go; see this article for example: The "home" team also gets its own signage, pregame hype videos, warm-up music and in-game sound effects, to simulate the feel of its own arena. The public address announcer even ...


2

Two points (or three if it were a three-pointer etc). Quoting from Article 10 "Status of the ball" from the FIBA 2020 rulebook: 10.3 The ball becomes dead when: Any field goal or free throw is made.


2

The only time I could find after 2000 was the 2007 Minnesota Timberwolves, Featuring Kevin Garnett, who won three overtime games in a row Jan. 3 through Jan. 7, against San Antonio (Featuring Tim Duncan), Philadelphia (Featuring Allan Iverson), and Houston (Featuring Yao Ming and Tracy McGrady). Going further back, I see the 1987 Phoenix Suns, Featuring ...


2

Reading the Oklahoma City Thunder's page on Statistical Analysis Primer, by Kevin Pelton of Supersonics.com, The TSP metric is discussed as follows: Shooting Efficiency - If there is an on-base percentage in the NBA - a statistic that has traditionally been undervalued - it would probably be some measure of a player's efficiency in scoring points. There's a ...


1

This is very easily searched for: The biggest margin in the history of the NBA is 68 and was achieved in 1991, when the Cleveland Cavaliers beat Miami Heat with 148-80 (game report). In there is also a link to this page showing lots of other NBA records. Here is another source.


1

In football (soccer), the tie breaker in a league table is goal differential, goals for, and goals against in that order. For that reason, teams should always aim to score goals. But, when one team has a huge lead over another, celebrations are more calm. Also, star players may be given a break to prevent injury and players that don't play as often may be ...


1

The defensive player is committing a foul in the situation described. I am drawing here from the NBA rules, but high school and NCAA are essentially the same. Section I—Types A player shall not hold, push, charge into, impede the progress of an opponent by extending a hand, arm, leg or knee or by bending the body into a position that is not normal. Contact ...


1

In 1986 the league was not yet using tenths of a second, but I believe Ralph Sampson's shot at the end of regulation certainly fits the spirit of the question. Inbounded with one second showing, Sampson makes a behind the head tip from twelve feet out to win the Western Conference Championship series. The pertinent part of the video linked below begins at ...


1

Another team member moved outside the baseline on the other side of the goal, received the “inbound” pass and dribbled onto the court. This is illegal. Take a look at this video. You will see the following: A Georgia Tech player makes a 3-pointer with 11.7 seconds remaining in the second half. A UConn player goes out of bounds, and picks up the ball to ...


1

Giannis Antetokounmpo Most Improved Player: 2016 -2017 MVP: 2018-2019, 2019-2020


1

As a system, the triangle is basically just four sets repeated according to the position of players and the ball on the floor. Whenever one ends without a good shot, if a team is well trained they will pick up into the next one seamlessly. It's similar to some old-school Dean Smith styled systems that way, but rather instead of trying to create a 1 on 1 ...


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