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5

The over shall go down in the books as a Maiden Over, but it will not be credited to either of the bowlers. As neither of the bowlers have actually completed said over (ie one bowler will be on 12.4 overs, and the other 15.2, for example), from a statisticians point of view, you can't award a bowler a Maiden for an over they have not fully completed. This ...


5

The obvious benefit of continuing the match into the second day is that it increases the chance of getting a result, given that there is no guarantee that a full day's play is possible on the second day. Indeed, the 2002 ICC Champions Trophy demonstrated the risk of starting anew. Despite 52 overs being completed on the first day, and 58 on the reserve day, ...


5

While the none of the Laws of Cricket or any of the playing conditions for any ICC tournaments cover this precise scenario, the playing conditions do cover the case of the ball hitting a camera suspended over the field; quoting from section 20.1.3 of the One Day International playing conditions as of June 2019: In a match where cameras are being used on ...


4

If Pakistan lose to Bangladesh, they have 9 points, which is less than the top four teams. They cannot make the semifinals this way. If Pakistan draws with Bangladesh, they require England's run rate to drop below their own, which requires an extremely large loss to New Zealand. Pakistan's net run rate or NRR would stay the same in case of a drawn match, ...


4

There is a new ICC regulation that teams in televised matches must have contrasting kits, just as in football or many other sports1. As India's normal blue jersey would clash with England's, one of the teams had to change - and the rules are that England always get priority as the home team for this World Cup, so India played the England match in their ...


3

Short answer: Law 19.8 is ambiguous and could be interpreted as permitting either 5 or 6 runs. 5 runs would be the common interpretation, though. Explanation From the Cricket World Cup 2019 Playing Conditions: Overthrow or wilful act of fielder If the boundary results from an overthrow or from the wilful act of a fielder, the runs scored shall be ...


3

I presume this is in relation to the use of Marnus Labuschagne as a substitute batsman for Steve Smith during the second test of the 2019 Ashes series at Lords. In which case this is an example of a Concussion Substitute. The concussion substitute was introduced by the ICC to all forms of international cricket (Men's and Women's), and also to First-class ...


3

If more than one player has equal stats (highest runs or wickets), what will they do? If some batsmen have same stat then the orange cap holder is the man which played least balls or highest strike rate or most percentage of boundaries then the other one. Same is the case with a best bowler who hold purple cap which have delivered least balls then the other ...


3

The laws are clear. Any non-pitching delivery which would or does pass the popping crease above waist height of an upright standing striker is by definition unfair. There is no allowance for the striker being outside the popping crease, and there is never a requirement that the ball pass the striker above shoulder height. If the striker's end umpire ...


3

Yes, it can be out, and the bail is not even necessary. Law 29, The Wicket is Down is clear on this situation. 29.2 One bail off If one bail is off, it shall be sufficient for the purpose of putting the wicket down to remove the remaining bail or to strike or pull any of the three stumps out of the ground, in any of the ways stated in 29.1.


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The 'Danger Area', or 'The Protected Area', is defined in the MCC Laws of Cricket: Law 41 - Unfair Play: 41.11 The protected area The protected area is defined as that area of the pitch contained within a rectangle bounded at each end by imaginary lines parallel to the popping creases and 5 ft/1.52 m in front of each, and on the sides by imaginary ...


2

Law 1.2 requires that the players of each team be provided in writing to the umpires before the toss, and thereafter not changed without the agreement of the opposing captain. Law 40 requires that the next batsman be ready on the field within three (3) minutes of a dismissal, unless Time is called. If the three minutes elapse without the batsman being ready,...


2

When judging a run out the best position is viewed as being level with the popping crease and in position to see the wickets being broken as well, at the end the ball is being thrown. Now lots of umpires including me suggest that at times a better view is gained by being at a 45 degree angle with the batsmen running towards you and the line. This is best ...


2

No, this is obviously not the case. Of the 58 final points table positions after pool play in the IPL seasons 2012-2018, only twelve (12) matched the fair play rank for that team, and only three of these were the award winners. If final points table positions and fair play award ranks are plotted with a linear regression model, there is almost zero ...


2

No. The tally of "fours" is specifically for scoring of a Boundary Four, not just any play that happens to score four runs.


2

To be considered a maiden convention is that it must be a completed over.


2

Before the Bangladesh match, Pakistan have scored 1710 runs from 338.5 overs and conceded 2073 runs from 303.4 overs. Even given a very unlikely scenario: Bangladesh bat first and are all out for zero. Pakistan score the one run they need to win without facing a legal ball (no ball, wide, etc) Pakistan's numbers will now be 1711 runs from 338.5 for, and ...


2

I initially wrote this as a comment on Nij's Answer but thought it deserved its own answer. It depends on if the Umpire has deemed the ball to be dead From Law 20 - Dead Ball 20.1.1 The ball becomes dead when 20.1.1.1 it is finally settled in the hands of the wicket-keeper or of the bowler. [...] 20.1.2 The ball shall be considered to be ...


2

Does it make any difference to the score or game? No. The batsman was in their ground, so they are not out. I'm wondering why he didn't knock the bails off anyway, just in case? Primarily, because doing so would at best (see below) be against the spirit of the game, the same as appealing on every ball even if it's blatantly not out would be. There's ...


2

As long as they are part of the playing XI (including any made concussion substitutes), they should be able to bowl, as there does not appear to be any rules stating against this. From the ICC T20I Playing Conditions*: Only nominated players in the match (including activated concussion replacements) may participate in the Super Over. Should any player (...


1

Under the normal laws for an LBW dismissal, the ball must impact the batsman inline with the stumps to be considered to be out LBW. However, if the batsman makes no genuine attempt to play a shot at the ball, the ball does not have to impact inline with the stumps, though it must still impact on the off-side of the stumps. MCC Laws of Cricket: Law 36 - ...


1

There's a few reasons I can think of outside of the "I'm just going to randomly chuck the ball at someone" that the ball may be passed between players between deliveries. Make people feel "In the game" Cricket can be a long ol' game if you're stuck in the field, and nothing is coming your way; especially in First-Class or Test cricket which can go on for 4-...


1

1977 was the centenary year of the Ashes. The first ever test match being held in 1877 at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. By way of celebration, a "Centenary Test" was held at the MCG in 1977. This test took place before that year's Ashes series but did not count towards it. Also, the Ashes series was moved to England during the 1977 Queen's Silver Jubilee ...


1

The batsman is clearly Out, Stumped. The situation meets all four requirements of Law 39.1.1: The ball is delivered and not a No ball, the batsman is out of their ground, the batsman has not attempted a run, and the wicket is put down by the wicketkeeper without intervention by another fielder. Since the exception in Law 39.3.1 does not apply (the batsman ...


1

This depends on the definition of an overthrow. It seems that the current set of rules (pdf) don't define what an overthrow is, only refer to it. From what I see in the video replay, the ball was en route to its intended target - the vicinity of the stumps, so it would have either hit the stumps or been collected by the wicketkeeper had Stokes' bat not ...


1

The regulations covering ODI cricket allow for a reserve day, in the event the match can't be completed on the first day. The umpires are required to try to complete the game on the scheduled day, by reducing overs etc If this isn't possible, and a reserve day is available, the regs state that the match will continue from the point where it was stopped. ...


1

bowler always bowls from one side, there is no rotation Note that this means that you are not playing in accordance with the Laws of Cricket. In particular, Law 17.1 states: The ball shall be bowled from each end alternately in overs of 6 balls. In theory, this means that the only answer to your question can only be "refer to the playing conditions for ...


1

Yes. First Class cricket is for Tests played in Domestic, International and A team matches. Likewise for List A in ODIs and T20 for T20s. You can refer the stats of Virat Kohli here just to get an idea. Virat Kohli Stats


1

The way you describe it, its a no ball. To be a legitimate delivery some part of the foot whether raised or grounded must be behind the popping crease No Ball.


1

Cricketers who play for other countries are most likely born and raised in that country. For example, Hashim Amla is an Indian by origin, but was raised in South Africa and gained nationality of South Africa. Thus, he is in the national team. If any player does not have a nationality of the country they wish to play for, then they most probably aren't able ...


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