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19

The strong safety lines up on the strong side - whichever side of the center has the most lineman on it (typically the tight end is the extra guy). If both sides have an equal amount of lineman (maybe a tight end on both sides of the line) the strong safety will typically line up across from whichever tight end they want to shut down in the passing game or ...


11

In the "old days (up to about 50 years ago), teams had two "ends" at either end of the line (i.e., 'tight' to the line and therefore 'tight end(s)') to receive passes. Other pass receivers included two "halfbacks" and one "fullback" situated behind the quarterback. Then teams decided that they only needed one halfback behind the quarterback, and moved the ...


8

The basic formula for WAR is as follows: WAR = (Batting Runs + Base Running Runs + Fielding Runs + Positional Adjustment + League Adjustment +Replacement Runs) / (Runs Per Win) Different sources will have different ways of calculating these values. Baseball Reference (ESPN's source) uses: bWAR: RS (Runs Scored) = Runs per Win + (mwRAA (a modified ...


7

Simplest solution is to go for a strict force-a-side defense. There's at least some chance the defender can watch both the disc at the current handler and keep track of Bob's actions in the corner of the eye. If the marker on the handler enforces one closed side, the defender can put himself clearly on the open side and watch both. Of course, there's no ...


6

Your recollection is wrong, at least under MLB rules. Quoting from the Official MLB rules, page 144: A FOUL BALL is a batted ball that [...] while on or over foul territory, touches the person of an umpire or player


6

As Tom Au stated, from a backer's perspective, the ”strong side” can simply be considered the side with the most receivers. But in even more overly simplified rule-of-thumb terms, the “strong side” is often the side of the ball with the most distance to the sideline – space – the most open-field to cover ... where you generally want your “strongest” [most ...


6

For the defense, there are three zones: the line (ends and tackles), behind the line (linebackers) and the backfield (cornerbacks and safetys.) The x-y-z defenese refers to the number of men on the line, linebackers and backfield respectively, that is 4-2-5. The confusion arises from the fact that the "3-4" defense is really the 3-4-(4), and likewise the "...


6

Many defenses will number different positions on the offensive lineman to indicate where the defender should line up. It's used as a short-cut. Each team can have their own system. Here are some that are the commonly accepted ones you'll hear on TV: 0 - head up on center 1 - outside shoulder of center 2 - inside should of the guard 3 - outside shoulder of ...


5

In a 4-3 defense, there are two defensive tackles (DT) in the interior of the line, while in a 3-4 defense, there is only one tackle - the nose tackle. Usually, the primary task of the nose tackle is to occupy more than one blocker in the interior of the line to allow linebackers to make plays. In contrast, the role of 4-3 tackles depends heavily on the ...


5

Zone- vs man-marking is a common dilemma in many sports. I have come across it in both basketball and football. If one puts aside the fundamental differences of these two sports, tactically-speaking the idea is roughly the same: In zone marking your are given a portion of the field you're responsible marking/defending. In man-marking however you are given an ...


5

Generally, your right but it really depends on how the Defense was constructed. As the FS, they must have ball skills and coverage skills while having the ability to disguise their coverage. QB often look at FS to tip the defense's coverage, so FS must be smart enough to play the cat and mouse game with the QB's eyes. FS is the leader of the secondary (like ...


5

Generally in defensive formations they are listed "downline men - linebackers - defensive backs*" (*defensive backs are not usually listed, 4-2-5 is an exception). So in 4-2-5, you have 4 down linemen, 2 linebackers and 5 defensive backs in this setup. This is a setup where you are expecting the pass, and have confidence in your linemen to get pressure on ...


4

One team I played on--which won UPA collegiate back when I wasn't a geezer--practiced defending them thusly: Forces must be absolute. Nobody breaks force. Ever. Man-defender faces iso-player and plays hard-and-tight man defense. We were often accused of playing "physical" defense just because our standard was to never allow more than two feet of separation ...


4

Nothing is ever obsolete in football, it always works in cycles. At the moment the defensive midfielder (a sole one as opposed to a two) has a prominent role in intercepting and conducting attacks however that may change when they begin to get exploited down in the space located to the sides of the position they cover. Another potential reasoning for it's ...


3

First lets make sure that most reading this get the general "standard" football formation on offense and defense, set up across from each other here (from womensfootballguide.files.wordpress.com): With some insight from this Dummies.com article, each positions is quite adapted to play certain roles: Generally safeties have player molds emphasizing ...


3

I haven't seen a pro team use a sweeper in YEARS. It's not about man-to-man marking, it's about pressuring the ball, getting the team compact behind the ball and blocking all the dangerous/penetrating passing lanes. You will always see the 4 at the back in a straight line when defending and staggered on possession. Any smart forward will play in line With a ...


2

The strong side is the side where the Tight End is lined up. Usually the right side, to help the Right Tackle block and provide a check-down option to the Quarterback. Now, the (a bit) more long explanation: The Football rules require the Offense to field seven players at the line prior to the snap. The whole (modern) offensive line have 5 players: two ...


2

I play sweeper. And I'm a senior in high school. My job is pretty clear but very hard to actually do. The sweep we'd job is to coach. I feel like I've had my best game when the other three defenders have played well. With that said, I am NOT obsolete. The sweeper ideally shouldn't have to touch the ball. However people screw up sometimes. The sweeper should ...


1

The biggest statistical indicators of a defensive forward in the NHL are going to be some new advanced "fancy stats" that have been taking the NHL by storm recently. The two main ones for players are Corsi and Fenwick, which are actually very simple. Corsi is just a player's +/- for shot attempts, and Fenwick is just a player's +/- for shot attempts not ...


1

Allowing defensive lines through easily is a way to use their own aggressiveness against them. It's a common way to start a screen pass play. Or you could take it to an extreme and not even attempt a block: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ao9GK5qTIIM In short, yes, it could be done. But lying down completely makes it hard for the linemen to participate ...


1

I use a sweeper because my team is not Barcelona. Usually your sweeper is your fastest, strongest and knowledgable player. On a slow attack i have him as secondary defender while stopper takes over his position. If a fast attack is in progress and the winger is flying, the stopper comes down and we transition to a traditional 4 man line. I think the ...


1

The last post about the guy in the men's league is one of the first people that knows what he's talking about. You can run an offsides trap effectively with a sweeper. Second, if a forward stays with a sweeper then he's gonna be in for a ride and he's never gonna be open for a pass. I've won a state championship and I've also coached a state championship ...


1

Very rare in pro ranks, but I play it on my men's competitive league and my college team (division 3) used it about a decade ago. I'm not making the argument that Pros and D1 colleges should be using sweeper. My point is that it's not just a young youth formation, it works quite well in men's league where most of us are former college players. The argument ...


1

If you pushed your centre forward on to my sweeper, who happens to be my most tactically aware player, I'd tell him to play you offside. The way to beat the sweeper system is to be fluid and attack with width and numbers,but at youth level, most teams are more rigid so it is surprising it isn't used more.


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