8

D/L or any other method is necessarily an approximation, so there will always be some strange edge cases. But it's arguably better than not having any result at all. Regarding your concerns of correctness. The D/L method is based on statistics from previous games, so it does generally take into account that teams have aggressive players in the lower ...


8

There are any number of unofficial calculator apps available on the web - a simple google search will give you links. The official software for calculating DLS (Duckworth-Lewis-Stern) scores is called Coda, and to my knowledge is only available through the cricketing boards in each country. Normally it is supplied to clubs or teams by the governing body of ...


7

My reading of the ICC regulations indicates that the above scenario would be a no-result. The regulations are available here. The relevant sections are: Section 12.4.2.B.iii states that a minimum of 20 overs in the second innings is required, subject to a result not being achieved earlier. In the example above, a result isn't achieved, as when the rain ...


6

The Duckworth-Lewis method is explained on the ICC website: Duckworth-Lewis Method description and guide to usage Duckworth-Lewis method FAQ Despite much confusion amongst the media, the players, and the public, the actual principle is relatively simple. When an interruption causes one team to have less resources available than the other team, the target ...


6

After the team batting first has started its innings and there is an interruption due to rain or any other factor, Duckworth-Lewis Method can be applied. This DL algorithm is applied and the target for the team batting second is calculated based on the overs that can be bowled as decided by the umpires. If I understand your question correctly, you are ...


5

No, not by a long way. In December 2014 Sri Lanka scored 242/8 against England's 236/5. However, because of rain delays, they had only 35 overs each, and England batting second achieved the par score with eight balls to spare, winning the match. Even earlier, in February 2006, India scored 328 all out in 49.4 overs while Pakistan scored 311/7 in 47.0 overs ...


5

Is it possible for a match to get tie even after applying D/L method? Why not? Suppose a team scored 280 runs in 50 overs. Team batting second gets target of 271 in 45 overs. If they score 270 after 45 overs, the match will be tied. Another simple example: A match is affected by rain before the match is started. So when the match is started it is reduced to ...


5

Yes, it's possible for a match to get tied after applying the D/L method. Some matches have ended in a tie this way, an example being the South Africa vs West Indies group stage match in Champions Trophy 2013. Here is the scorecard of that match.


5

The D/L method was designed with 50-over matches in mind. It came in for some criticism during the 2012 World Twenty20 when it was applied to some matches that were greatly reduced in duration due to rain. The team batting second was put at a great advantage as they were able to use all 10 wickets to pursue a D/L target that was only moderately above the ...


4

If your question is if this system is fair, then my response is that it is highly criticized. This method has been criticized based on the fact that wickets are (necessarily) a much more heavily weighted resource than overs. For winning a match if rain is interpreted the match, strategy could be to not lose wickets and score at what would seem to be a "...


3

The free-hit rule is more recent than Duckworth–Lewis so the original D/L method (which came into force in English domestic cricket 1997) would not have taken this into consideration. I have been following cricket for many years in England and I’m not aware of any changes to the D/L system taking the free-hit into account. However, it is worth noting that ...


3

Yes, the Duckworth-Lewis method would be applied in all three scenarios. The only scenario in which a rain-shortened match does not have the Duckworth-Lewis method applied is if the match is shortened before the start of the first team's innings, as in that case both teams are equally aware of the number of overs they will face before starting their innings.


3

Note that net run rate is not part of the Laws, being only applicable to games played within a tournament, and so the precise method of calculation will depend on how the tournament specifies it (although I believe it remains virtually identical across tournaments, with possibly no changes at all). In the ICC Champions Trophy 2013, this is how net run rate ...


3

There are not any current news for this; you will find some references like this one, but the case is that these are not yet officially quoted by ICC so it is hard to believe such stuff. Also here is a news article which says they are continuing with DL. Well in the race of other methods the one which is considered was VJD method. But as noted in ...


2

In the given scenario, if the rain interrupts the game after 12 overs of the second innings and the play can't resume (i.e. not possible) after that, the game will be declared as "no result" sadly. To get result of the match by D/L method, the target must be set by D/L method. To set the target by D/L method, all the conditions (e.g. no rain, fit ground etc)...


2

In matches where Duckworth-Lewis revised targets are set due to interruptions which reduce the number of overs bowled, those revised targets and revised overs are used to calculate the net run rate for both teams. For example, in a 50-over World Cup first-round group match, Team A are dismissed for 165 in 33.5 overs. Team B progresses to 150-2, but ...


2

It is a method is used in cricket to calculate the target score when the match is interrupted and the required quota is not completed. Most of the time this is used for matches which were stopped due to rain. An alternative method for this is Jayadevan's_Rain rule. Please note that DL method is what used in all international matches nowadays. You can get ...


2

You can look up the D/L regulations and tables published by the ICC. It only talks about balls remaining and wickets in hand as resources. So free hits are not considered. In order to model an end-of-game scenario like that accurately, you could arguably also want to consider who is on strike, who is bowling, whether you have any DRS reviews left, and so ...


1

There is no difference in the method of application of Duckworth-Lewis, between matches. The only potential difference could be in the tables or equivalent that are used to generate the targets, which should reflect different scoring rates and potentials between the two match types. However as suggested by http://www.espncricinfo.com/magazine/content/story/...


1

Of course, yes. The best example for your question is match between South Africa VS Sri Lanka in 2003 world cup which was actually tied game under D/L method which eventually made South Africa to get eliminated from the tournament in group stages.


1

Duckworth-Lewis can be applied at any stage: the tables allow for the calculation of the par score after each ball, so a team could theoretically win on D/L after just one ball of their innings. However, in order to prevent teams winning on the basis of such a small "sample size", to borrow a statistical term (for instance, winning on the strength of ...


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