18

My question is: is it okay to be overly passionate/borderline aggressive when on the pitch playing a team sport without it carrying over to off the pitch interactions? Nope Simple answer: Unless everybody on the team thinks that's okay (or they are paid to accept it), that's simply not okay. Being on the pitch reveals the worst of a person's character. In ...


12

I have been in what appears to be this exact same situation (captaining a social indoor cricket team). There is no single right answer, but here are some ideas that appeared to work. First, clarify your approach upfront, before you form the team or enter it into the competition. If you said you'd share the games around, then you should stick with that, I ...


9

If you play just for fun without any results being recorded you'll often have a few guys who don't give their best, simply because they don't have or want to. After all it's just for fun and having fun on the pitch can be very different from one person to another. Some people (like you) want to win every single game and someone else might be more interested ...


9

Competitive sports will be like this. Learning to deal with cheap shots will just be another skill to pick up. Opponents pull cheap shots for two reasons: to create actual game play advantage and rattle you. In the sports I've played cheap shots meant to rattle the opposing player are often legal even if they are cheap. Referees are not there to make ...


8

There's not going to be anything really governing 'serving hard' as ethical or not ethical. I played volleyball for 6 years, so I eventually had a pretty good serve as well. In PE class, or at parties (4th of July, etc.) that tend to have a volleyball net up, I would rather do Float Serves instead of just a power serve/ jump serve. It's less cocky looking, ...


8

Answering your particular case: Your football skills (especially game vision, defensive skills) should match your leadership ambitions. Apart from the seniority in the team or leadership qualities, these are the skills players need to have to captain their teams. If you are in possession of these skills and if you create chances for your teammates to play (...


7

You have a good text book answer that you already accepted. I will simply give you my take as a big - 6'3" 200lb point guard - that takes a ton of abuse especially when playing in lower income areas - top city leagues. You are going to get pulled, scratched, elbowed, pushed, whatever. By just "taking" these actions you are allowing the referee to just ...


7

The role of the sight screen is to help the batter see the ball at the start of its flight, as it leaves the bowlers hand. If you think about the angles involved, it is mainly the upper portion of the sight screen that is used, so a fielder standing in front of it would not block this view. The problem with spectators is typically not that they are in front ...


7

Being a "should" question makes this difficult to answer, but I'll try. The superstition by the players actually has some basis in reality. The idea is to not inflate the event in the pitchers mind. It's doubtful, but at many points throughout the game the pitcher may not even be aware of a perfect game or no hitter is in progress. In any event, the idea ...


5

I'm not familiar enough with Cricket to offer a specific, concrete solution. However, in games like softball or soccer, it's not at all uncommon to have people split their time in the game. So, person A plays the first half of the game while person B plays the second half. In the case of soccer, it may be delineated by periods, while in softball it may be ...


5

It is not unlawful to field between bowler and side screen. In fact there is a fielding position for that and it is called straight hit. Usually the fielder is placed at an angle and I don't remember any captains using this fielding position. You can see all the rules here.


5

There is ostensibly no requirements in law that the referee wait (while the wording and structure of Law 12, in addition to all statements about time, delays and restarts, suggest that referees should aspire to the least amount of delay possible). As a practical matter, the referee needs to ensure the player knows they have been cautioned, as that fact ...


4

I've been through this kind of issue with other sports, and the best solution I know of is to make it clear why you're playing the game. That may sound obvious, but once you get round to asking people, you discover that they actually have significantly different motivations: Some players are there because they want to play the game at the highest level they ...


4

I think it's a lot like golf as well, and I think I can generalize a bit on this. Sports that have competitors who typically show restraint and reserve typically are those which also expect silence from spectators. These sports are usually sports where a player isn't directly contesting the actions of an opponent; rather, opponents are both trying to do ...


3

Yes, it is disrespectful. They're mocking their opponents with actions like these. It's basically saying "We're so awesome we don't even need a goalie against you". There are better ways to prevent them from being bored every week. For example rotation: Just let them play on a different position. This has cool side effects as well, such as: They learn ...


3

This is more of a comment but too long... I used to help run tennis tournies in my teens. I made people went to the right court, had balls, had towels, cleaned up trash, whatever. I also helped deal with disputes. First almost no tennis tournaments have umpires in the US at least - unless there are school affiliations, meaning it is a high school or ...


3

Watching the home run ball is considered poor sportsmanship. For a pitcher, giving up a home run is the worst mistake you can make. And, right or wrong, many pitchers see it as an insult and get very angry when they have just given up a homer and the batter stops and stares at it. Sometimes they will be so angry that there will be retaliation against the ...


3

Arguing with the referee would run through the same sanctioning scale as other misconduct offences: A verbal warning delivered through the game captain Yellow card (no other consequences) Penalty - loss of point and service (red card) Expulsion (red + yellow card together) Disqualification (red + yellow card separately) Reference: Rule 21 of the Official ...


3

Before the ball is struck by the batter on strike, the non-striker can stand where they like, restricted only by the limits to how far they can 'back up' and being prohibited from running or standing on the centre strip of the pitch. In practice, batters pretty much all stand in the same place and it is up to the fielders to adjust their position if they ...


3

In junior cricket, the (adult) coaches and umpires have a responsibility to ensure player safety and should (and in my experience typically do) intervene to prevent players putting themselves in unnecessary danger in this fashion. In Australia at least, over the last 5-10 years the wearing of protective equipment by junior players has become universal due to ...


2

I think it depends on whether the local rules stipulate that players should play "Ready Golf". This is common at public and semi-private courses and basically states that all players through the green should split up to their lies and take their shots in their time, rather than travelling in a group from lie to lie. If a ball is thought to be lost, the ...


2

Your group has five minutes to find the ball. If the ball is not found, the player has to declare it lost and go back to the starting point to shoot another stroke (after assessing a one stroke penalty). So, it is more feasible to try to find the lost ball as fast as you can. Since your group has to pass around your ball once your partner hit his second shot,...


2

What do players that are available but are not playing, because you have enough, do? If you play it as a social sport, everyone wants to be there, even though they don't play. In that case, the best option is making sure that everyone has the same amount of time without playing (as a substitute). Otherwise, it can happen (as an extreme case), that one ...


2

I can speak to athletics/track and field, the sport I sometimes cover. Most events at a professional level and NCAA events at the national level require athletes to pass through a "mixed zone" after competition. This is (usually) a divided space with athletes on one side of a barrier and reporters on the other. This is where post-competition interviews ...


2

I was interested in this question after I read it, as I often wondered the same thing. There are definitely those players that use the media and use it as a tool to smack-talk other teams, and then there are those players that use the media as a tool to build team chemistry and compliment the work done by not only themselves but also their teammates. A quote ...


2

A few options that can be used in lawn tennis, which may also work in padel: only allow one serve for the stronger player, rather than two the weaker player can play to the doubles' lines, but the stronger must play to the singles' the weaker player can start each game with a point advantage


2

1) It's not that cheap. Pulling jersey, being grabby, etc. are all "in-between" type of plays. It's physical play that isn't necessarily a foul. Remember, basketball IS a physical sport. Not every time players come in physical contact with each other it's a foul. 2) Suck it up, no excuses. The fact that it's frustrating you means you aren't being ...


2

This is an interesting question, one that I (have) had myself earlier in my tennis playing days. After a certain point, I was a good enough player to easily be able to see when someone had bad form, bad habits, or just not enough experience to know what to do to improve their game. You are probably at a similar experience/skill level yourself. Tennis seems ...


2

There are many factors and reasons that watching a homerun ball is considered bad etiquette. One stems from the difference in the regular behavior vs. the behavior when a homerun is hit. Baseball players are taught from a young age to not watch the ball when they hit it, but to turn and run to first base. Turning your head and watching the play invariably ...


1

You'll be unlikely to find a quote for this, so I'll draw upon personal experience as a player and referee. First, let's clarify the referee's role in stopping play for injuries. Law 5 - The Referee, Section 3 - Powers and Duties: The referee: ... allows play to continue until the ball is out of play if a player is only slightly injured ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible