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1

About 60% As you mention, the starting team wins about 60% percent of the time. This paper in the American Economic Review, freely available from the London School of Economics repository here, analyses every penalty shootout in a major tournament (world cup, continent cup, English/German/Spanish cup, uefa league and champions league) for which data was ...


4

The term for sending the ball past the opponent's goal line into the net is goal. The term for sending the ball past one's own goal line into the net is own goal. You're putting the emphasis on the wrong part. Instead of distinguishing goals from own goals, you should distinguish own goals from goals - "own goal" is a term exactly for that purpose. ...


1

The major soccer countries in Europe (including Spain, Italy, Germany, England, France) roughly have their season run from late Summer to late Spring the following year. Then the knockout competition(s) will run at different times, usually within that time frame. For example, in England, a Premier League or Championship team will not start playing in the FA ...


4

There was a similar question about squeezing the ball between two feet and hopping across the field. The answer that @studro gave there applies here as well. The questions though are not duplicates. An indirect free kick can be awarded to the opposing team because of LOTG 12.2 as already mentioned by @Joe Playing in a dangerous manner Playing in a dangerous ...


4

The major difference between European sports and American sports is that teams compete in multiple competitions during one season, as opposed to American teams which typically play in one competition only. To take English soccer, the top 92 teams will all compete in: A division of the Premier League / Football League - each team plays each of 19-23 other ...


2

This has happened before. Liverpool won the champions league in 2004-05 season, but finished 5th in the EPL. They were given an exemption by UEFA and added to the first round of the qualifying rounds. They managed to go through all qualification rounds and made it to the tournament that year. UEFA later decided to allow the champions direct berth to the ...


3

Barring anything better, I would suggest that the following line from the FIFA Laws of the Game (12.2) would apply: Playing in a dangerous manner Playing in a dangerous manner is any action that, while trying to play the ball, threatens injury to someone (including the player themself) and includes preventing a nearby opponent from playing the ball for ...


12

The European Championships used to have a 3rd-place playoff, but it was discontinued after Euro 1980. Attendance was poor (24,652 spectators in a stadium that could hold 81,000), and according to The Athletic, TV viewing figures were also disappointing. As a result, UEFA decided there simply wasn't enough interest in the playoff to justify continuing to hold ...


0

There is no outside clock under FIFA (IFAB) rules. The referee decides how much time will be added at half-time or at the end of regulation time. If the officiating crew has communication equipment, the referee will advice the 4th official of the added time. The 4th then holds up the board indicating the minutes added. However, NCAA soccer have time clocks. ...


2

To take a pertinent example, the referee and tournament officials will be sensible when a serious injury happens to player. If the match needs to be stopped for an extended period of time, for example to allow an ambulance to attend to a player, nobody is going to say "keep the clock running and we'll play 3 hours of additional time". I don't ...


-1

A yellow card during Kicks from the Penalty Spot does not relate to the yellow card during regular time. Thus the goalie can continue. Re player sent off during Kicks from the Penalty Spot. The other team does not reduce its number of players. The reduction only refers to number of players during regulation time. If a player on Team A is injured and cannot ...


2

The naming thing isn't so odd. Often a club needs a name to distinguish it from other clubs in the same area, and just giving a more specific neighborhood doesn't cut it, because the club didn't start off wanting to represent a specific location as much as to embody some sort of ideal. Many are named after some sort of classic ideal, like Atalanta. You'll ...


4

No, there was no such champion neither in the World Cup nor in the Euros which didn't concede at least one goal during the tournament. Even in pre 1976 Euros when championship basically consisted of a semifinal and a final game, champions would always concede at least a single goal. The best result so far can be attributed to Spain during Euro 2012 when they ...


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