18

Let's start from the end. The best player who plays "false 9" today is, without any doubt, Lionel Messi. There isn't one definition of a "false 9", but I will try to explain it from my understanding. "False 9" is generally a player who isn't a pure striker as defined in the past. This player will drop deep into the field to be a part of or start the ...


16

To me, there is still a difference between a Defensive Midfielder, and a Sweeper. Mainly in that a DM (has also been called a Stopper in some instances) is supposed to "stop" the fast flow of an attack before it totally breaches the back line. Where as the Sweeper will/can roam the back line and pick up the loose ends of the (hopefully) thwarted attack. ...


14

From the rulebook: Section 5 Position of Players at the Snap Article 1: Offensive Team. The offensive team must be in compliance with the following at the snap: (a) It must have seven or more players on its line (3-18); and (b) All players who are not on the line, other than the receiver of the snap under center, must be at least one yard ...


14

In modern soccer, the formation is not a rigid structure, and the player positions are more flexible. Especially the wingbacks (defenders at the far left and right) combine the functions of a classical full back with a (midfield) winger – when they get to the ball, they quickly move forward along the side to prepare an attack, often even participating in ...


12

I think your question should refer to non-striker tactics and that's what I will refer to in my answer. First of all Barcelona are playing, like Spain, without a real striker but they have Messi (Villa who isn't a typical #9 was injured), and as you can see they are very successful. You have to read the following amazing and interesting article: http://...


12

One way is through corners and free kicks. The central defenders are often the best headers of the ball in the team, because they need to be able to defend crosses and long balls when defending. Because of this strength, they will often take a position close to the opposition goal for corner kicks and free kicks in the opposition half, and try to score a ...


11

In the "old days (up to about 50 years ago), teams had two "ends" at either end of the line (i.e., 'tight' to the line and therefore 'tight end(s)') to receive passes. Other pass receivers included two "halfbacks" and one "fullback" situated behind the quarterback. Then teams decided that they only needed one halfback behind the quarterback, and moved the ...


10

This is a more complex question than I initially thought, and most of that stems from some weird wording in the NFL rules. The provision that allows the QB to throw the ball away once he's outside the tackle position refers specifically to that - "the tackle position." (Rule 8, Section 2, Article 1, Item 1.) However, the tackle position is never fully ...


9

Just to add some illustration to the existing good question and answers. The top five goalscoring (excluding penalty kicks) defenders in the history of the Premier League are: John Terry (26) William Gallas (24) Dan Petrescu (23) Sami Hyypia (22) John Arne Riise (21) As you can see from this, you've got Terry and Hyypia who are very dominant in the air, ...


9

The biggest difference is in the number of Defensive Backs on the field for the play, and you would use the dime defense to prevent the mid to longer range passes. A couple of explanations below will help clarify it for you. While it is great in the pass game, it does leave the defense susceptible to the run. In American football, the dime defense is a ...


9

The rules actually don't say anything about formations. The only thing they say is that there are 11 players per side - one of which is designated a goalkeeper, and that if a team drops below 7 players the match cannot start/continue (source: IFAB Law 3: The Players.) Formations are all about strategy. If the team is playing an attacking strategy, they will ...


8

There is no requirement to have a wicket-keeper at all times. However, according to Law 40.1: If by his actions and positioning it is apparent to the umpires that he will not be able to discharge his duties as a wicket-keeper, he shall forfeit this right and also the right to be recognised as a wicket-keeper He will therefore not be allowed to keep ...


8

If one just takes your question by its title then obviously there are plenty of strikers who also comply significant defensive roles. In fact in the famous game Football Manager there is a specifically designed role called "Defensive Forward" who closes down the opponent a lot and try to tackle. In real life the most famous example of such a forward is Wayne ...


7

Well for one, you have the advantage of not being over run in midfield. For example, if you play 4-2-3-1 against a classic 4-4-2 then you have 3 central midfielders (2 defensive, middle of the attacking three) against the 2 central midfielders of the 4-4-2. Additionally, in a 4-2-3-1 the 2 defensive midfielders can concentrate on providing the defensive ...


7

It is certainly 4-4-2 as almost all teams in England were using that formation back then. Of course the English Premier League didn't exist in the 1980s as it started in 1992, but I have assumed the question relates to the top-flight English league, so that would be Division One (the First Division) pre-1992. One reason often cited for the poor performance ...


6

I'd say that the sweeper role IS somewhat obsolete, partially because what has been already taken up by others but also because defense mentality has changed quite a bit with the development of the game, and the training that goes with it. Consider this scenario, would you like your last defender to be behind your main line of defense? Obviously the ...


6

There is no requirement to have 11 fielders on the field at all times. Law 1 (The players) makes provision for the number of players per team to be varied by agreement of the captains: By agreement a match may be played between sides of fewer than, or more than, eleven players, but not more than eleven players may field at any time. A no-ball will not be ...


6

The requirement of seven offensive players on the line of scrimmage was an outcome of trying to make football 'a more open game.' (see The Forward Pass in Football) To summarize the issue with football in the early twentieth century, the game was low-scoring, and most plays consisted of handing the ball to one player and having a him surrounded by his ten ...


6

As Tom Au stated, from a backer's perspective, the ”strong side” can simply be considered the side with the most receivers. But in even more overly simplified rule-of-thumb terms, the “strong side” is often the side of the ball with the most distance to the sideline – space – the most open-field to cover ... where you generally want your “strongest” [most ...


6

For the defense, there are three zones: the line (ends and tackles), behind the line (linebackers) and the backfield (cornerbacks and safetys.) The x-y-z defenese refers to the number of men on the line, linebackers and backfield respectively, that is 4-2-5. The confusion arises from the fact that the "3-4" defense is really the 3-4-(4), and likewise the "...


5

I found a great post here: http://home.earthlink.net/~tfakehany/system.html Volleyball systems are referenced numerically. When describing a Volleyball system with numbers, the first number indicates the number of players who are primarily hitters and the second number indicates the number of players who are primarily setters, example: in a "4-2" offense, ...


5

Defenses have indeed, "figured it out". The top 4 rushing teams that run the Wishbone/Triple-Option—Georgia Tech, Air Force, Army, and Navy—are a combined 21-35. However, they are successful running the ball with all four being in the top 6 in rushing in the FBS. Teams approach this offense by containing the rush and funneling the play up the ...


5

Sorry I can't comment on wax eagle's answer, as I don't have 50 rep; I did, however, want to note that in 2013 the NFL added formation requirements to the Defense: ILLEGAL FORMATION: The defense cannot have more than six players on the line of scrimmage on either side of the snapper during kicking plays. This rule is designed to protect players who are in ...


5

Zone- vs man-marking is a common dilemma in many sports. I have come across it in both basketball and football. If one puts aside the fundamental differences of these two sports, tactically-speaking the idea is roughly the same: In zone marking your are given a portion of the field you're responsible marking/defending. In man-marking however you are given an ...


5

Ron Roenicke, manager of the Milwaukee Brewers, has brought in an outfielder to be a fifth infielder on numerous "sudden-death" occasions. For example, the game is tied, the Brewers are the road team, and the home team has a man on 3B with one out. If the runner at third is the only runner, then Ron Roenicke typically walks the next batter (and will walk ...


5

Generally in defensive formations they are listed "downline men - linebackers - defensive backs*" (*defensive backs are not usually listed, 4-2-5 is an exception). So in 4-2-5, you have 4 down linemen, 2 linebackers and 5 defensive backs in this setup. This is a setup where you are expecting the pass, and have confidence in your linemen to get pressure on ...


5

The easiest way is to watch the pregame show. Usually about 5-10 minutes before kickoff they will show the two teams and their formation on the field. This can also be a good way to familiarize yourself with different players. If you miss the pregame show and are just watching the run of play, it can be tougher, but still possible. Formations are always ...


4

Nothing is ever obsolete in football, it always works in cycles. At the moment the defensive midfielder (a sole one as opposed to a two) has a prominent role in intercepting and conducting attacks however that may change when they begin to get exploited down in the space located to the sides of the position they cover. Another potential reasoning for it's ...


4

Actually Barcelona uses that formation only on paper. They rarely have 4 players playing as defenders, they kinda use 3 (two central defenders and one full back pass the ball between them and the keeper). Playing like this allows them to have a greater number of players in front (where two of the attacking players sit very wide on the pitch) which is ...


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