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6

It's because the Golden Knights are a recent expansion team themselves, and so they don't have to give up a player to Kraken, the newest expansion team. This is based on the agreement the Knights made when joining the league. They wouldn't be part of the expansion draft for a number of years, but also wouldn't get a share of the expansion fee either. See ...


1

This is a textbook example of cap manipulation. The salary of the players under the Long Term Injury Reserves (LTIR) doesn't count towards the salary cap for their team. The player is still payed, but it just doesn't count against the cap. This is to allow teams to replace a player while they're out with long term injuries. But once a player comes back the ...


3

There are exemptions for injured players, where the team continues to pay the salary but it does not count to their cap. So, although Tampa Bay had a payroll over the cap, they did not actually exceed the cap. They were able to have one of these players actually return for the playoffs, since the cap is for the regular season roster. A bit of a quirk of the ...


1

This is due to Nikita Kucherov and his injury. The NHL Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) specifies that players' salaries are paid only during the regular season, and Kucherov was injured for the entire regular season, so counts as $0 against the cap - so the Lightning were technically never over the cap at all. Note that this isn't anything "new&...


3

The 1942 Toronto Maple Leafs are the only team in the NHL history to make a comeback after being down 3-0 in the Stanley Cup Finals series. All other reverse sweeps were made in the first 3 rounds.


5

The list of comebacks from 0-3 down in NHL playoffs (entirely, not just the Stanley Cup finals) is very short: 1942 Stanley Cup Finals (Leafs over Red Wings) 1975 quarterfinals (Islanders over Penguins) 2010 conference semifinals (Flyers over Bruins) 2014 first round (Kings over Sharks)


5

Other answers cover a lot of ground, but I wanted to note that the game today is different than the game in the helmetless era. Consider: Bernie Geoffrion is given credit for inventing the slapshot, and his playing career was from 1950-1968. Slapshots are much faster than other shots. Bobby Hull and Stan Mikita are credited with curving the blades on their ...


4

Yes, and it's not because they were especially stupid. People even a couple generations ago were dramatically less risk-averse than today. They accepted a certain risk of injury as part of playing professional sports, and they didn't consider the risk of a head injury as being particularly high (until, as Joe mentions, one incident caused a shift in ...


15

NHL players started wearing helmets for the most part after a player, Bill Masterson, died from a check that caused him to hit his head on the ice at speed. That occurred in 1968. The mandate was about a decade later: [I]t took another ten years before the then-President of the NHL, John Ziegler, made protective helmets mandatory for all new incoming ...


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