We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
6

I realize this is an older question, but I think my answer might be useful to other people with the same or similar questions. Anti-spin rubber can take the spinniest of serves and return it virtually deadened. Several rubber manufacturers create anti-spin rubber. It is designed for exactly what you're looking for, however there are some disadvantages as ...


5

Wetsuits should not really be washed in the washingmachine and definitely not dried in the drier. I'm selling wetsuits and this is one of the biggest NO NO -s that you really have to stick to. The tumbling of the wetsuit will damage the materials and stitchings, especially with thick ones. And it will be really bad with taped seams, which will become loose ...


4

Suppose your ice-hockey gloves use leather made of cattle. It sounds natural that the best oil to use with it is an oil of cattle such as neatsfoot oil or some other animal-oil with similar properties. Mink-oil cannot be used as a neatsoil because it is not liquid in room-temperature, this is a key feature way neatsfoot looks to be the best candidate to get ...


4

Yes it is a major task to maintain any leather material, How to clean a leather There are two main types of leather finished unfinished and you can use water to differentiate different leathers, video here showing how: shortly, if it soaks water, it is unfinished leather; if it does not soak water, it is a finished leather. This page explains the below ...


4

I'd recommend leaving it to the pros if possible. Newer materials used by manufacturers may be more easily damaged than they would be on some of the older models of skates, and some models might not recommend baking of any sort. Many hockey shops will do it for free or minimal cost even if you didn't buy your skates from them. However, if you don't have ...


4

I have played Division 1 baseball, and I was recruited to play both infield (SS) and pitch, so I have a little experience for this question. Frankly speaking, the glove is all about preference by the player. Personally, I hated breaking a glove in. I felt as though breaking it in (even though it makes catching a lot easier) really broke down the fabric ...


4

I used to play tennis 3 or 4 days a week and sweat a lot too and I live in the Phoenix, Arizona area where it's 100+ F four or five months a year so I experienced the same thing as you with my dri-ft and clima-cool tennis clothing. Here is something you can try that I had some good results with: Musty smells can occur if your clothing is stored in ...


4

Personally, I would forget cleaning and get the table reclothed. You may get the stains out, but the oils can damage the material in a way that can affect the playing surface.


3

I think it is a good idea to get clubs fitted. It shouldn't matter where you buy them unless you want to get clubs fully designed for your game. It really depends on how well you play, how much you want your clubs to fit your game, and how much money you are willing to spend. Golf club fitting is beneficial because the shaft will be cut to the right ...


3

Judging by the way the crack is moving up the back of the bat it needs some form of repair or strengthening before it breaks. Depending on where your based I'd try and find a local bat maker or contact the shop you bought it from to get Kookaburra to look at it. I've generally found the bigger brands won't deal with you direct, you have to go via the shop. ...


3

It is possible to lengthen your racquet (at least the handle/grip) - however, you don't want to attempt it yourself unless you really know what you're doing. I would recommend looking into a service such as what is provided by RPNY where racquet customization professionals can do the modification to your racquet. I've tried playing with a 28.5" racquet ...


3

I found a very useful link (CardBoardConnection) that can help you with the frame. There, you have a step by step "How to Frame a Jersey": Measure your jersey to pick the right sized frame. Most jerseys will fit in either a 30" x 36" or 32" x 40" frame. Lay the jersey out in the desired position (and orientation to the frame) on the matte backing ...


2

This question really comes down to how much money you want to spend on the preservation of your collection. On the low end of the spectrum (and perfectly suitable), you could put all commons in penny sleeves and a top loader. Then put them into a square tupper ware container to protect against water and what not. The downside is where they're stored once ...


2

I find anything that doesn't leave fibres on the rubber works. I often just use a paper towel.


2

Here is How I did it: Buy a decent Wilson kid's racquet, 250g or so with a thin handle, other brands may have different core shapes that might be difficult to work with. Remove the wrap of the handle and the butt cap. Cut off about 3 inches of hardened glue from the bottom of the handle, expose the metal or carbon fiber core inside. Buy a piece of square ...


2

Elmer's Rubber Cement is the classic glue for Table Tennis Blades. But it is no longer legal for tournaments. If you glued within a week you will likely fail the sniff test for VOCs (solvents). Water based glues are what you are supposed to use now. Tear Mender, YES Paste and Elmer's no Drip School Glue are common choices now.


2

Try a thin layer of black charcoal dry lubricant (Home Depot has them in a spray can.), test it and see if it's slippery enough (it would not smear after it drys in 3-5 min. Tape/cover the areas you don't want to cover. Use it on the black side only or your want the red side to turn black. To remove wipe with WD40, it will be a bit messy.


2

I'm uncertain about the life expectancy when washing your wetsuit in the washer but I'd say that it wouldn't be anything to worry about. In your case, it's safe to say that the dryer was what caused the damage. Washing the wetsuit with cold water on a gentle cycle (less than average amount of soap) shouldn't cause any noticeable issues with the wetsuit. ...


2

Putting a ball in it and tying it up will help create a pocket. The problem with that is it usually isn't a very natural pocket. The best way to break in a glove is to play catch with it. It will take time, but it will be broken in to your hand, the way you catch. Depending on the model and brand, it may be more or less difficult to break in a glove. ...


2

I don't have a definitive link, but the answer to the basic question is- sort of. They don't use pine tar, as that would leave a residue on the gloves; but they do occasionally use other substances that are more subtle. According to a user on the ModSquadHockey forums, one common practice is to rub the tape against some more tape - the sticky side, that ...


2

Well, part of the fitting is to determine what you already know; swing speed of various clubs. That in turn determines your position along a bell curve of player profiles that will indicate the type of clubs you should buy. Players with stronger, faster swings should use clubs with stiffer shaft flexes, lower lofts (or a wider range of lofts) and less draw ...


2

Never wash your wetsuit in a washing machine! Here is a great article that will help and outlines each step - https://www.quiksilver.com.au/wetsuit-care-guide Stay clear of sharp objects (as best you can). Rinse your wetsuit. Turn it inside out and have another go. Hang up your freshly rinsed wetsuit inside out to dry in the shade. After ...


2

There won't be much damage to the table's surface unless it is exposed to direct sunlight. But the change in climate might cause slight damage. Covering the table with a thick table cover would be the best option. The thicker the table's surface is the better protection it provides.... Hope this helps!!!


2

Check your wheels for flat spots. Flat spots make your wheels wobble in turns. Check if any bearings are broken or close to be worn out. Check if the screws of your wheels need replacement or aren't fully screwed in. Check if your wheels have spacers or need replacement. Check if the frame is in a bad condition or is at least properly attached.


1

As a beginner skier, I would recommend renting your equipment, particularly skis until you find the type and length you feel comfortable with. You would want to start with a shorter ski until you feel comfortable with that length - nothing can deter a beginning skier faster that skis that are too long for them. Once you are in a position to buy, many ...


1

If this an unused glove you need to properly form it. There are many methods but I always used neetfoot oil to soften the leather and then placed a ball in the pocket and kept it there when not in use. The photo appears to be a bit of a "roll" in the pocket standing up. Just oil it to soften and use it and see if it forms to your liking. I am not saying it ...


1

It is actually not advised to play table tennis outdoors directly the sun as it will cause damage (warping)to the table's surface. A blue table is the best because it provides the best vision of the ball (White or yellow).


1

As a hockey player, I (more often than not) would apply wax (Commonly found as SexWax) on my stick. It's a perfectly legitimate resource to use, and adds a little more grip when stick handling. As for pine tar, I'm not certain, although, with how well it works for baseball grips, it may be worth a shot to apply a bit on the heel of your stick and see if it ...


1

Check your barrel for scratches (replace it if you find any) Clean your barrel Rotate the barrel a little bit Try using heavier balls If it doesn't help, try using elastic (silicon) hop-up rubber


1

Yes - they can be used. The bearing size is generally the same (with some exceptions, but those are always flagged up as such) All you need is a wrench/spanner or pliers. Undo the axle bolts holding on the existing wheels Slip the old wheels off Slip the new wheels on Tighten up the bolts Enjoy.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible