5

This is fairly common for sports with knockout rounds, as the required "3rd/4th place" playoff match always feel a bit pointless - see for example boxing or taekwondo (links to 2012 rather than 2016 just because the 2016 hasn't yet reached the medal rounds in those sports). For a non-Olympic example of the same, see Euro 2016 where again there is no 3rd/4th ...


2

I do not practice boxing or martial arts, but I am a tennis player, and every coach will say the same about hitting the ball as a martial arts coach will about hitting an opponent - the power should come from your core and lower body, rather than your arm/shoulder. The idea is to use large muscle groups (quads, hamstrings, glutes, core) to create movement. ...


2

This has happened in MMA, in the infamously known as "Detroit Dance", a match between Dan Severn and Ken Shamrock at UFC 9. In the end, judges scored the match for Dan Severn and nothing much happened. This article explaining the reasons is funnier than the match itself.


1

There are numerous reasons for this orbiting movement around the ring seen in all types of fighting matches. First, fighters wish to move since being a mobile target often has the benefit of being harder to hit. Bear in mind that fighters wish to also control the ring and their opponents through this spinning in question. Whether the spinning occurs clock-...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible