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22

This is going to depend a lot on the sport. In general, a reporter does have access to several resources, many of which are accessible to a dedicated fan, but when putting together commentary on the spot it helps a lot to have deep personal knowledge of the sport to consider what facts to research. (This kind of knowledge can be developed by a fan regularly ...


10

First, the object is a "football". See Definition 9: The ball used in any game called "football". Second, your premise is mistaken. Commentators do call it the "ball". From http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/sports/league-of-denial/transcript-50/ He fumbled the ball! And let’s see— Minnesota has it! Jeff Seamon on it. Joe Starkey's call of "The ...


7

Short answer: no, that play doesn't come from a specific game The story behind the play can be found in this article, but below is the important bit: From all those days and nights in front of the television, Meat Loaf -- along with legendary song writer Jim Steinman -- pieced together what is, without question, the most famous baseball play-by-play call in ...


7

There are no rules. Players get to give a shout out to one school and they say whatever they want. Would the networks let a player who went to Miami say they went to Oregon? Probably not. But as long as a player played at a school they can mention that school. Some players mention their high school out of pride, others have done it because they left ...


6

Cricket like baseball is a sport that actually works quite well on the radio, and many commentators on the sport commentate on radio as well as TV. In such 'voice only' circumstances you want to give your audience a summary of the score at frequent intervals, and with Cricket you have the natural cadence of the 'over' of ~6 balls, so this is often used. ...


6

There are guidelines for social media which is enforced by the IOC. Basically they are encouraged to use social media to post or tweet photos etc as long as; any such postings, blogs or tweets must be in a first-person, diary-type format Also they can't use their social media to promote sponsorships or advertisements. This next quote is probably the ...


6

This is taken from various websites, so anyone is free to correct me if I'm wrong. Charles Barkley: $1 million/year and has been with TNT for 13 years and his contract is due to expire in 2018. Kenny Smith: $1 million/year Ernie Johnson (host): $2.7 million/year Shaquille O'Neal: $1 million/year Sources: Charles Barkley, Contracts, Extention


6

There are a couple of reasons why professional baseball players' salaries are public. Baseball employs a luxury tax rule that penalizes teams when the salaries are too high. The salaries need to be made public in order for this system to work. Other sports have salary cap rules which also require public knowledge of the athletes' salaries. Professional ...


6

To understand this phenomenon, you need to know something about the culture of sports in the US. First: there is no promotion/relegation system for professional sports. This means that in any particular sport, most of the US has no local professional team at the highest level. And if you are not living near a major metropolis, you are not likely to ever get ...


6

Sometimes tournament organizers show the team colors near the scoresheet. E.g, during Champions League games this information is shown in the upper left corner of the screen, but it can also depend on the broadcaster. Here e.g. the corresponding indicator in the upper left corner shows that Real Madrid players wear white, while Liverpool players are playing ...


5

According to Source, it will be around 28 Cameras. The production will be among the most sophisticated ever too, with 28 cameras, including seven ultra-motion cameras, Spidercam as well as graphics with key analytics, all of which will take the viewer right to the heart of the action.


4

That theme song which played was from Vangelis - conquest of paradise


4

Sports are so lucrative for the reasons you mention (huge ad revenue). But you fail to mention the reason the ad revenues are so high. People don't Tivo sports. Sure some people do, but for the most part people want to watch sports live. This is why ad revenue is so high. Football (Soccer) has struggled to get a TV footing in the states, and has only now ...


4

I can only speak for Germany but here the Bundesliga (national soccer league) games are only available in paytv for live broadcasts so they collect a fee directly and are then commercial free. The only matches available in free tv are the openers of the season halves (so the season opener and the first match after winter break) and the relegation matches. (...


4

I believe it's The White Stripes - 'Seven Nation Army'.


3

Television Blackouts of sporting events do occur outside North America. For example, Soccer games in the UK are blacked out if they're played between 245 and 515 on a Saturday. Telegraph: The UK’s Saturday-afternoon TV football blackout (from 2.45pm-5.15pm) has been in place since the 1960s, when it was feared that the relatively new medium would drive ...


3

According to Google Trends there has not been a significant increase in popularity over time, although the world cup certainly generates unusually high interest (search term "soccer"; graphs limited to US region): Here is the same trend compared with basketball (search term "soccer" in blue, "basketball" in red): Basketball has increased in popularity over ...


3

Yes, there are some venues where alcohol advertising is banned, and any team sponsored by an alcoholic beverage company changes its livery for those races. When Williams was sponsored by Anheuser-Busch, the team changed the branding on their car to Sea World Adventure Parks (owned by Anheuser-Busch) for non-alcohol venues. Alcohol advertising is currently ...


3

It really depends on the manager. In Belgium I've seen managers give their full line up including exact positions in pregame interviews, while in other games they would even leave a spot open until right before kick off. So, sometimes they know it exactly. Other times they may have to make an educated guess. When TV broadcasters show the team they ...


3

It appears that this year (2016) at least that some games will be available via Twitter. https://nflcommunications.com/Pages/2016-'Thursday-Night-Football'-Broadcast-Schedule-Announced.aspx


3

There is an "official online distribution channel for regular season games". It's called NFL GamePass but is only available outside the US. Within the US, games are locked up by the contracts with the broadcast networks with the exception of NFL Network games - these are sometimes available live through NFL.com (or have been in the past).


3

Best leagues in Europe are almost always on pay channels, which end up cashing in serious sums of money from fans, especially from pubs and cafés that show the game to their guests. In some countries you could see ads added on the dead spots on the pitch (e.g. behind the goals) and even overlaid on the fans sometimes. It's pretty annoying to have invasive ...


3

His name is Beau Estes, here is another video of him introducing himself: http://www.nba.com/video/channels/nba_tv/2014/07/10/20140710-free-agency-update.nba/


3

Headshot is a common term, actually, but the term you're probably looking for is publicity photo, or PR photo. See SABR's images page for example for use of both terms (Headshot and Publicity Photo). See Wikipedia's page on the use of publicity photos for more detail (as the term is not unique to sports). Headshot is definitely common, if not more common ...


3

For all major badminton tournaments, not just the Olympics, they only use a limited number of courts for major games (e.g semifinals and finals). As a result the scheduling works in a way for example on one day, on a specific court: Women's Doubles Semi Final #1 4pm Men's Doubles Semi Final #1 5pm Women's Singles Semi Final #1 6pm Men's Singles Semi Final #...


2

I believe that when commentators shout "score!" when a player scores, it's more often than not preceded by "he shoots". Therefore, what the commentators really say is: "he shoots, he scores!". But they say it at a very rapid pace that to any regular audience, it might sound like just "score!". Also, goal and point in ice hockey are two different things. A ...


2

Because they paid the most for the rights to show the Olympics. proof? from the June 7, 2011 LA Times: NBC holds on to Olympics through 2020 with $4.3-billion bid June 7, 2011 | 12:20 pm It is rare that the incumbent is the underdog, but that's what NBC was when it came to holding on to the U.S. television rights for the Olympics. With ...


2

I can speak to athletics/track and field, the sport I sometimes cover. Most events at a professional level and NCAA events at the national level require athletes to pass through a "mixed zone" after competition. This is (usually) a divided space with athletes on one side of a barrier and reporters on the other. This is where post-competition interviews ...


2

I was interested in this question after I read it, as I often wondered the same thing. There are definitely those players that use the media and use it as a tool to smack-talk other teams, and then there are those players that use the media as a tool to build team chemistry and compliment the work done by not only themselves but also their teammates. A quote ...


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